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Heroines (Semiotext(e) / Active Agents)

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Heroines (Semiotext(e) / Active Agents) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

I am beginning to realize that taking the self out of our essays is a form of repression. Taking the self out feels like obeying a gag order--pretending an objectivity where there is nothing objective about the experience of confronting and engaging with and swooning over literature." — from Heroines

On the last day of December, 2009 Kate Zambreno began a blog called Frances Farmer Is My Sister, arising from her obsession with the female modernists and her recent transplantation to Akron, Ohio, where her husband held a university job. Widely reposted, Zambreno's blog became an outlet for her highly informed and passionate rants about the fates of the modernist "wives and mistresses." In her blog entries, Zambreno reclaimed the traditionally pathologized biographies of Vivienne Eliot, Jane Bowles, Jean Rhys, and Zelda Fitzgerald: writers and artists themselves who served as male writers' muses only to end their lives silenced, erased, and institutionalized. Over the course of two years, Frances Farmer Is My Sister helped create a community where today's "toxic girls" could devise a new feminist discourse, writing in the margins and developing an alternative canon.

In Heroines, Zambreno extends the polemic begun on her blog into a dazzling, original work of literary scholarship. Combing theories that have dictated what literature should be and who is allowed to write it--from T. S. Eliot's New Criticism to the writings of such mid-century intellectuals as Elizabeth Hardwick and Mary McCarthy to the occasional "girl-on-girl crime" of the Second Wave of feminism--she traces the genesis of a cultural template that consistently exiles female experience to the realm of the "minor," and diagnoses women for transgressing social bounds. "ANXIETY: When she experiences it, it's pathological," writes Zambreno. "When he does, it's existential." By advancing the Girl-As-Philosopher, Zambreno reinvents feminism for her generation while providing a model for a newly subjectivized criticism.

Review:

"Zambreno (Green Girl) carries out a literary lightning raid against what remains, in her view, the boys' club of canonical American and modernist literature. An author of two novels, she constructs a loose-jointed fusion of feminist literary criticism and personal memoir that draws on her other writerly identity, as the proprietor of the blog Frances Farmer Is My Sister. Amid recollections of early married life — which see the underemployed Zambreno's moves, from Chicago to London to Akron, Ohio, dictated by her husband John's academic career — she interpolates the stories of her pantheon of literary idols. With an unabashedly fannish voice, Zambreno pays tribute to the oft-ignored, and sometimes ill-fated, 'wives and mistresses' of notable male writers. Famed writers Anaïs Nin and Jean Rhys figure into the book's personal mythology, but so do Vivienne Eliot and Zelda Fitzgerald, whose marginal status Zambreno passionately opposes in her accounts of their life and art. Zambreno's form deliberately evokes the fleeting, fragmented nature of online communication: one passage astutely comments on Mary McCarthy just below a note claiming 'I buy a NARS lipgloss called Orgasm.' She ends with a tribute to her fellow literary bloggers, issuing a powerful clarion call for a supportive community of female writers who will fixate on their own experiences without shame and reject the 'measuring rod' of the 'Great American (Male) Novelist.'" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Kate Zambreno is the author of two novels, O Fallen Angel and Green Girl. She currently lives in a cottage in Carrboro, North Carolina, with her partner, John, and her puppy, Jean Genet.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781584351146
Author:
Zambreno, Kate
Publisher:
Semiotext(e)
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Women's Studies
Subject:
Feminist Studies-Reference
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Semiotext(e) / Active Agents Heroines
Publication Date:
20121005
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Pages:
312
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Feminist Studies » General
History and Social Science » Feminist Studies » Reference
History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Womens Studies
Humanities » Literary Criticism » General
Humanities » Philosophy » General

Heroines (Semiotext(e) / Active Agents) New Trade Paper
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Product details 312 pages Semiotext(e) - English 9781584351146 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Zambreno (Green Girl) carries out a literary lightning raid against what remains, in her view, the boys' club of canonical American and modernist literature. An author of two novels, she constructs a loose-jointed fusion of feminist literary criticism and personal memoir that draws on her other writerly identity, as the proprietor of the blog Frances Farmer Is My Sister. Amid recollections of early married life — which see the underemployed Zambreno's moves, from Chicago to London to Akron, Ohio, dictated by her husband John's academic career — she interpolates the stories of her pantheon of literary idols. With an unabashedly fannish voice, Zambreno pays tribute to the oft-ignored, and sometimes ill-fated, 'wives and mistresses' of notable male writers. Famed writers Anaïs Nin and Jean Rhys figure into the book's personal mythology, but so do Vivienne Eliot and Zelda Fitzgerald, whose marginal status Zambreno passionately opposes in her accounts of their life and art. Zambreno's form deliberately evokes the fleeting, fragmented nature of online communication: one passage astutely comments on Mary McCarthy just below a note claiming 'I buy a NARS lipgloss called Orgasm.' She ends with a tribute to her fellow literary bloggers, issuing a powerful clarion call for a supportive community of female writers who will fixate on their own experiences without shame and reject the 'measuring rod' of the 'Great American (Male) Novelist.'" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
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