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My first novel, Love Me Back, was published on September 16. Writing the book took seven years, and along the way three chapters were published in... Continue »
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This title in other editions

Teenage Waistland: A Former Fat-Camper Weighs in on Living Large, Losing Weight, and How Parents Can (and Can't) Help

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Teenage Waistland: A Former Fat-Camper Weighs in on Living Large, Losing Weight, and How Parents Can (and Can't) Help Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Ellin's parents got it all wrong when it came to helping her lose weight — but what would have been right? In this fresh, frank, funny look at childhood obesity and its treatment, she journeys through diet culture seeking a better way.

We've been inundated lately with books and articles about childhood obesity. Most offer cultural critique or nutrition and exercise advice — in tones that are alternately appalled and patronizing. Few address the psychological, medical, cultural and developmental complexities affecting overweight kids. The truth is, many parents already know that Whoppers are fattening. What they don't know is how to effectively help an often discouraged, often reluctant kid on what will be a difficult, life-long journey.

Abby Ellin, a journalist and former fat-camper whose parents' attempts to "save her" from fatness proved counterproductive, has had a lifelong interest in figuring out how they might have done it better, and an abiding compassion for overweight kids. In Teenage Waistland she shares the story of her own adolescent struggle with food and weight, and journeys with hope, skepticism, and humor through the landscape of today's diet culture. She visits camps and community programs, and talks to experts, kids and their parents, seeking to answer these questions: What can parents say that kids will hear? Why don't kids exercise more and eat less when they're dying to be thinner? What treatment methods actually work? Willpower, or surrender? Shame, or inspiration? Teenage Waistland is ultimately clarifying and provocative for anyone who's ever wrestled with weight issues. One size does not fit all when it comes to weight loss, and the better we understand that, the more likely we are to be able to help our kids.

Review:

"Ellin, a freelance journalist and former fat-camper, wants parents of obese teens to understand a few essential points. First, there's no single answer to the obesity problem — what's right for one kid may be useless for another. Don't shame obese children by calling them fat or out of control, or by putting them on highly restricted diets while other family members munch on fried chicken. Respect 'nutritionally challenged' children, and focus on the many things to love about them. Teach them about living healthy, which involves more than just knowing which foods to pick. Ellin has researched fat camps (expensive but a relief from real-world struggles), behavior modification programs (difficult to keep up), gastric bypass surgery (effective but fairly dangerous), drugs (largely ineffective) and the 'size acceptance' approach (theoretically fine, but maybe they're kidding themselves). The problem with this book may be that it's a little too honest — teenage obesity is not easily solved with a Frenchwoman's recipes for diuretic leek soup. Yet the author's compassion and her willingness to share her personal life, along with the book's appendix listing helpful resources, may bring comfort to many distraught parents. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"One part investigative journalism, one part self-help, and one part personal narrative, Waistland is intriguing...both eloquent and moving." The Boston Globe

Review:

"A unique, empathetic perspective on this issue [Ellin] writes with compassion and humor about the trials of overweight kids." Bookpage

Review:

"An honest, grimly funny report from a world that's lost all sense of proportion about fat." Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

Synopsis:

Ellin's parents got it all wrong when it came to helping her lose weight — but what would have been right? In this fresh, frank, funny look at childhood obesity and its treatment, she journeys through diet culture seeking a better way.

About the Author

For five years, Abby Ellin wrote the "Preludes" column, about young people and money, in the Sunday Money and Business section of the New York Times. She also regularly writes the "Vows" column in the New York Times Sunday Styles section, as well as feature assignments for the New York Times Magazine. Her work has appeared in a range of publications, including Time, the Village Voice, Marie Claire, More, Self, Glamour, the Boston Phoenix, and Spy (RIP). She's an editor-at-large for Gotham magazine and has an MFA in Creative Writing from Emerson College. But her greatest claim to fame is naming "Karamel Sutra" ice cream for Ben and Jerry's.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781586484606
Subtitle:
A Former Fat Kid Weighs In on Living Large, Losing Weight, and How Parents Can (and Can't) Help
Author:
Ellin, Abby
Publisher:
PublicAffairs
Subject:
Health - Nutrition
Subject:
Weight Loss
Subject:
Life Stages - Teenagers
Subject:
General Health & Fitness
Subject:
Children's Health
Subject:
Health and Medicine-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20070109
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 14.8 oz

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Child Care and Parenting » Children's Health
Health and Self-Help » Child Care and Parenting » Parenting Teens

Teenage Waistland: A Former Fat-Camper Weighs in on Living Large, Losing Weight, and How Parents Can (and Can't) Help Used Trade Paper
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$1.75 In Stock
Product details 288 pages PublicAffairs - English 9781586484606 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Ellin, a freelance journalist and former fat-camper, wants parents of obese teens to understand a few essential points. First, there's no single answer to the obesity problem — what's right for one kid may be useless for another. Don't shame obese children by calling them fat or out of control, or by putting them on highly restricted diets while other family members munch on fried chicken. Respect 'nutritionally challenged' children, and focus on the many things to love about them. Teach them about living healthy, which involves more than just knowing which foods to pick. Ellin has researched fat camps (expensive but a relief from real-world struggles), behavior modification programs (difficult to keep up), gastric bypass surgery (effective but fairly dangerous), drugs (largely ineffective) and the 'size acceptance' approach (theoretically fine, but maybe they're kidding themselves). The problem with this book may be that it's a little too honest — teenage obesity is not easily solved with a Frenchwoman's recipes for diuretic leek soup. Yet the author's compassion and her willingness to share her personal life, along with the book's appendix listing helpful resources, may bring comfort to many distraught parents. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "One part investigative journalism, one part self-help, and one part personal narrative, Waistland is intriguing...both eloquent and moving."
"Review" by , "A unique, empathetic perspective on this issue [Ellin] writes with compassion and humor about the trials of overweight kids."
"Review" by , "An honest, grimly funny report from a world that's lost all sense of proportion about fat."
"Synopsis" by ,
Ellin's parents got it all wrong when it came to helping her lose weight — but what would have been right? In this fresh, frank, funny look at childhood obesity and its treatment, she journeys through diet culture seeking a better way.
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