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    Station Eleven

    Emily St. John Mandel 9780385353304

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This title in other editions

Fatale

by

Fatale Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"The building that I'm writing this review in is called the City of Books. It houses over a million volumes in over 68,000 square feet of retail space, and while I haven't heard of a recent measurement, at last count, there was around 12 linear miles of shelves displaying all of these books.

In this enormity of space and books, nestled quietly on a shelf slightly above eye-level in the Gold Room (where we feature mysteries and thrillers, among other genres), there's a writer whose English-language offerings take up less than an inch-and-a-half of shelf space. Three slim volumes that can be easily overlooked in a search for more commercial authors shelved nearby." Gerry Donaghy, Powells.com (Read the entire Powells.com review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A New York Review Books Original

Whether you call her a cold-hearted grifter or the soul of modern capitalism, there's no question that Aimée is a killer and a more-than-professional one. Now she's set her eyes on a backwater burg, where, while posing as an innocent (albeit drop-dead gorgeous) newcomer to town, she means to sniff out old grudges and engineer new opportunities, deftly playing different people and different interests against each other — the better, as always, to make a killing. But then something snaps: the master manipulator falls prey to a pure and wayward passion.

Aimée has become the avenging angel of her own nihilism, exacting the destruction of a whole society of destroyers. An unholy original, Jean-Patrick Manchette transformed the modern detective novel into a weapon of gleeful satire and anarchic fun. In Fatale he mixes equal measures of farce, mayhem, and madness to prepare a rare literary cocktail that packs a devastating punch.

Review:

"First published in 1977, this masterful hit man narrative from Manchette (1942-1995) strips down and flips expectations, anticipating La Femme Nikita by several years. 'For her stay in Bléville, the young woman had chosen to call herself Aimée Joubert, and that is what I shall call her from now on,' Manchette says of his female assassin, who 'aside from her husband,' as French author Jean Echenoz mentions in the afterword, 'has already killed seven men, among them a factory owner, a stock breeder, and a doctor.' Told in tight behaviorist language and laced with deadly black humor, this compact neo-noir follows Joubert as she steps much too far into her self-made career toward a showdown worthy of any action film. Written between Three to Kill and The Prone Gunman, Manchette's two books previously translated into English, this tense thriller should only add to his growing reputation in America. (May)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review:

"In France, which long ago embraced American crime fiction, thrillers are referred to as polars. And in France the godfather and wizard of polars is Jean-Patrick Manchette....[H]e's a massive figure....There is gristle here, there is bone." Boston Globe

Review:

"Cool, compact, and shockingly original." Marilyn Stasio, New York Times

Review:

"Manchette called crime novels 'the great moral literature of our time.' Manchette pushes the Situationist strategy of dérive and détournement to the point of comic absurdity, throwing a wrench into the workings of their main characters' lives and gleefully recording the anarchy that results." Jennifer Howard, Boston Review

Review:

"Manchette is legend among all of the crime writers I know, and with good reason: his novels never fail to stun and thrill from page one." Duane Swierczynski, author of Expiration Date

About the Author

Jean-Patrick Manchette (1942–1995) was a genre-redefining French crime novelist, screenwriter, critic, and translator. Born in Marseille to a family of relatively modest means, Manchette grew up in a southwestern suburb of Paris, where he wrote from an early age. While a student of English literature at the Sorbonne, he contributed articles to the newspaper La Voix Communiste and became active in the national students' union. In 1961 he married and with his wife, Mélissa, began translating American crime fiction — he would go on to translate the works of such writers as Donald Westlake, Ross Thomas, and Margaret Millar, often for Gallimard's Série noire.

Throughout the 1960s, Manchette supported himself with various jobs writing television scripts, pornographic screenplays, young-adult books, and film novelizations. In 1971 he published his first novel, a collaboration with Jean-Pierre Bastid, and embarked on his literary career in earnest, producing 10 subsequent works over the course of the next two decades and establishing a new genre of French novel, the néo-polar (distinguished from traditional detective novel, or polar, by its political engagement and social radicalism). During the 1980s, Manchette published celebrated translations of Alan Moore's Watchmen graphic novels for a bandes-dessinée publishing house co-founded by his son, Doug Headline.

In addition to Fatale, Manchette's novels Three to Kill and The Prone Gunman, as well as Jacques Tardi's graphic-novel adaptations of them (titled West Coast Blues and Like a Sniper Lining Up His Shot, respectively), are available in English.

Donald Nicholson-Smith's translations of noir fiction include Manchette's Three to Kill, Thierry Jonquet's Mygale (a.k.a. Tarantula), and (with Alyson Waters) Yasmina Khadra's Cousin K. He has also translated works by Guy Debord, Paco Ignacio Taibo II , Henri Lefebvre, Antonin Artaud, and Guillaume Apollinaire. Born in Manchester, England, he is a longtime resident of New York City.

Jean Echenoz is a prominent French novelist, many of whose works have been translated into English, among them Chopin's Move (1989), Big Blondes (1995), and most recently Ravel (2008) and Running (2009).

Product Details

ISBN:
9781590173817
Author:
Manchette, Jean-Patrick
Publisher:
New York Review of Books
Translator:
Nicholson-Smith, Donald
Author:
Nicholson-Smith, Donald
Author:
Nicholson-Smith, Donald
Author:
Manchette, J.
Author:
Echenoz, Jean
Author:
Manchette, J. P.
Author:
Manchette, Jean-Patrick
Subject:
General
Subject:
Crime
Subject:
General-General
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20110631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
112
Dimensions:
7.97 x 5.02 x 0.38 in 0.28 lb

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Mystery » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Mystery » Sale Books
Fiction and Poetry » Popular Fiction » Crime

Fatale New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$12.95 In Stock
Product details 112 pages NYRB Classics - English 9781590173817 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "First published in 1977, this masterful hit man narrative from Manchette (1942-1995) strips down and flips expectations, anticipating La Femme Nikita by several years. 'For her stay in Bléville, the young woman had chosen to call herself Aimée Joubert, and that is what I shall call her from now on,' Manchette says of his female assassin, who 'aside from her husband,' as French author Jean Echenoz mentions in the afterword, 'has already killed seven men, among them a factory owner, a stock breeder, and a doctor.' Told in tight behaviorist language and laced with deadly black humor, this compact neo-noir follows Joubert as she steps much too far into her self-made career toward a showdown worthy of any action film. Written between Three to Kill and The Prone Gunman, Manchette's two books previously translated into English, this tense thriller should only add to his growing reputation in America. (May)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Review A Day" by , "The building that I'm writing this review in is called the City of Books. It houses over a million volumes in over 68,000 square feet of retail space, and while I haven't heard of a recent measurement, at last count, there was around 12 linear miles of shelves displaying all of these books.

In this enormity of space and books, nestled quietly on a shelf slightly above eye-level in the Gold Room (where we feature mysteries and thrillers, among other genres), there's a writer whose English-language offerings take up less than an inch-and-a-half of shelf space. Three slim volumes that can be easily overlooked in a search for more commercial authors shelved nearby." (Read the entire Powells.com review)
"Review" by , "In France, which long ago embraced American crime fiction, thrillers are referred to as polars. And in France the godfather and wizard of polars is Jean-Patrick Manchette....[H]e's a massive figure....There is gristle here, there is bone."
"Review" by , "Cool, compact, and shockingly original."
"Review" by , "Manchette called crime novels 'the great moral literature of our time.' Manchette pushes the Situationist strategy of dérive and détournement to the point of comic absurdity, throwing a wrench into the workings of their main characters' lives and gleefully recording the anarchy that results."
"Review" by , "Manchette is legend among all of the crime writers I know, and with good reason: his novels never fail to stun and thrill from page one."
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