It's Raining Books Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Interviews | September 2, 2014

Jill Owens: IMG David Mitchell: The Powells.com Interview



David MitchellDavid Mitchell's newest mind-bending, time-skipping novel may be his most accomplished work yet. Written in six sections, one per decade, The Bone... Continue »
  1. $21.00 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    The Bone Clocks

    David Mitchell 9781400065677

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$12.00
List price: $21.95
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
23 Partner Warehouse General- General

Reporting Iraq: an Oral History of the War By the Journalists Who Covered It (07 Edition)

by

Reporting Iraq: an Oral History of the War By the Journalists Who Covered It (07 Edition) Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"[A] searing document, one of the most revealing chronicles of the war yet published. It is as though correspondents are talking late into the night, trying to explain what it was like, what sights and smells haunt them, what they're proud of and what they regret, what they saw coming and what they didn't." Anthony Swofford, The Washington Post Book World (read the entire Washington Post Book World review)

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

Following in the footsteps of best-selling books about the war, Reporting Iraq is a fully illustrated narrative history of the war by the world's best-known reporters and photojournalists. Included are contributions from fifty journalists, including Dexter Filkins (the New York Times correspondent who won widespread praise for his coverage of Fallujah), Rajiv Chandrasekaran (author of Imperial Life in the Emerald City ), Anthony Shadid (the Washington Post reporter awarded a Pulitzer Prize for his Iraq reporting), and Patrick Cockburn (from London's Independent ).

In this, the first book to tell the history of the war through the end of 2006, the deadliest period of conflict, we learn that most journalists saw a disaster in Iraq before they were allowed to report it. This revelation, along with hundreds of untold first-person stories, makes Reporting Iraq a fascinating look at the war and an important critique of international press coverage.

Reporting Iraq is published in conjunction with the Columbia Journalism Review , America's premier media monitor and watchdog of the press in all its forms, from newspapers and magazines to radio, television, wire services, and the web.

Review:

"With pens down and cameras shuttered, 44 reporters casually and directly discuss all angles of the War in Iraq, including their own shock, fear and incomprehension, in this compilation of interviews conducted by The Columbia Journalism Review. In thematic, loosely chronological chapters ('In the Beginning,' 'Turning Points,' 'The Embeds,' 'The Good News'), the Iraq situation escalates from uncertainty to lawlessness to siege mentality and open insurgency alongside sunny reports from officials: 'Iyad Allawi was saying that almost the entire country was safe,' while freelancer Andrew Lee Butters was learning doctors in Mosul's main hospitals 'were getting three headless bodies delivered to the morgue everyday.' A dramatic portrait of Iraq's day-to-day emerges: freelancer Nir Rosen sympathizes with Iraqis' fear of American soldiers; CBS News' Elizabeth Palmer, meanwhile, sees the 'ill-prepared' soldiers in essentially the same predicament as the Iraqis: 'hostages of a terrible situation.' Back home, reporters deal with misinformation, media bias and post-traumatic stress, as well as disillusionment, shame and rage over the stories that will likely never reach a mass audience. The New Yorker's John Lee Anderson says 'there's no proper way' to cover war that isn't 'rife with contradictions and problems'; this vital, breathtaking collection may be the closest contemporary reporting gets to cutting through the fog of war. 22 color photos." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Never in the fifty years that I have been in or around the news business have I read a better record of a historic event than this." Reese Schonfeld, founding president of CNN

Review:

"This should be required reading in every journalism class from high school to graduate school." James W. Crawley, president of Military Reporters and Editors

Synopsis:

The world's best known reporters tell the story of what really happened in Iraq in a gripping and gritty narrative history of the war.

Included are contributions from fifty international journalists, including Dexter Filkins, The New York Times correspondent who won widespread praise for his coverage of Fallujah; Rajiv Chandrassekaran, author of Imperial Life in the Emerald City; Anthony Shadid of the Washington Post, who won the Pulitzer Prize for his war coverage; Richard Engel of NBC; Anne Garrels of NPR, and other star reporters from both the print and broadcast world, not to mention their translators, photo journalists, and a military reporter.

All come together to discuss the war from its beginning on, and they hold back nothing on the violence they faced—Farnaz Fassihi of the Wall Street Journal talks about her near–kidnapping by "five men with AK–47s" chasing her car. ("I kept thinking, 'This is it.'") Nor do they hold back discussing how this impacted their work—British reporter Patrick Cockburn of The Independent notes that "One had to spend an enormous amount of time thinking about one's own security," and NPR reporter Deborah Amos observes that it was even more complicated for women: "As time went on we had to dress as Iraqi women, in the most conservative costumes Iraqi women would wear."

But perhaps the most fascinating—and chilling—observation is that most saw a disaster in Iraq unfolding long before they were allowed to report it. As Jon Lee Anderson of The New Yorker puts it, various governmental authorities and the media's own fears combined "to keep bad news away from the public," an observation supported by over 21 stunning, full–color photographs—many of which have never been published before due to such censorship.

Collected by the editors of America's most prestigious media monitor, the Columbia Journalism Review, such revelations make Reporting Iraq a fascinating and unique look at the war, as well as an important critique of international press coverage.

Synopsis:

“A searing document, one of the most revealing chronicles of the war yet published. It is as though correspondents are talking late into the night, trying to explain what it was like, what sights and smells haunt them, what they’re proud of and what they regret, what they saw coming and what they didn’t.”
—Anthony Swofford,The Washington Post

“Never in the fifty years that I have been in or around the news business have I read a better record of a historic event than this.”
—Reese Schonfeld, founding president of CNN

“This should be required reading in every journalism class from high school to graduate school.”
—James W. Crawley, president of Military Reporters and Editors

Following in the footsteps of best-selling books about the war, Reporting Iraq is a fully illustrated narrative history of the war by the world’s best-known reporters and photojournalists. Included are contributions from fifty journalists, including Dexter Filkins (the New York Timescorrespondent who won widespread praise for his coverage of Fallujah), Rajiv Chandrasekaran (author of Imperial Life in the Emerald City), Anthony Shadid (the Washington Postreporter awarded a Pulitzer Prize for his Iraq reporting), and Patrick Cockburn (from London’s Independent).

In this, the first book to tell the history of the war through the end of 2006, the deadliest period of conflict, we learn that most journalists saw a disaster in Iraq before they were allowed to report it. This revelation, along with hundreds of untold first-person stories, makes Reporting Iraq a fascinating look at the war and an important critique of international press coverage.

Reporting Iraqis published in conjunction with the Columbia Journalism Review, America’s premier media monitor and watchdog of the press in all its forms, from newspapers and magazines to radio, television, wire services, and the web.

About the Author

Mike Hoyt is Executive Editor of the Columbia Journalism Review.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781933633343
Subtitle:
An Oral History of the War by the Journalists who Covered It
Author:
Hoyt, Mike
Editor:
Columbia Journalism Review
Editor:
Palattella, John
Editor:
Palatella, John
Author:
Palattella, John
Author:
Columbia Journalism Review
Author:
Palatella, John
Author:
Columbia Journalism Review
Publisher:
Melville House
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Military - Iraq War (2003-)
Subject:
Journalism
Subject:
Media Studies
Subject:
Reporters and reporting
Subject:
Social conditions
Subject:
Iraq War, 2003
Subject:
Iraq - Social conditions - 21st century
Subject:
World History-Iraq War (2003-?)
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20071001
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
300
Dimensions:
8.99x7.46x.41 in. .97 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. The Bookseller of Kabul
    Used Trade Paper $5.50
  2. Tunney: Boxing's Brainiest Champ and... Used Trade Paper $8.95
  3. Grand Canyon: A Century of Change:... New Trade Paper $42.95
  4. Grand Canyon Wild: A Photographic... Used Hardcover $8.95
  5. The Few: The American "Knights of... Used Trade Paper $6.95
  6. Last Night at the Lobster: A Novel
    Used Hardcover $5.95

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Journalism » Reference
History and Social Science » Middle East » Iraq
History and Social Science » Military » Iraq War (2003-)
History and Social Science » Sociology » Media
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General

Reporting Iraq: an Oral History of the War By the Journalists Who Covered It (07 Edition) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$12.00 In Stock
Product details 300 pages Melville House Publishing - English 9781933633343 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "With pens down and cameras shuttered, 44 reporters casually and directly discuss all angles of the War in Iraq, including their own shock, fear and incomprehension, in this compilation of interviews conducted by The Columbia Journalism Review. In thematic, loosely chronological chapters ('In the Beginning,' 'Turning Points,' 'The Embeds,' 'The Good News'), the Iraq situation escalates from uncertainty to lawlessness to siege mentality and open insurgency alongside sunny reports from officials: 'Iyad Allawi was saying that almost the entire country was safe,' while freelancer Andrew Lee Butters was learning doctors in Mosul's main hospitals 'were getting three headless bodies delivered to the morgue everyday.' A dramatic portrait of Iraq's day-to-day emerges: freelancer Nir Rosen sympathizes with Iraqis' fear of American soldiers; CBS News' Elizabeth Palmer, meanwhile, sees the 'ill-prepared' soldiers in essentially the same predicament as the Iraqis: 'hostages of a terrible situation.' Back home, reporters deal with misinformation, media bias and post-traumatic stress, as well as disillusionment, shame and rage over the stories that will likely never reach a mass audience. The New Yorker's John Lee Anderson says 'there's no proper way' to cover war that isn't 'rife with contradictions and problems'; this vital, breathtaking collection may be the closest contemporary reporting gets to cutting through the fog of war. 22 color photos." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "[A] searing document, one of the most revealing chronicles of the war yet published. It is as though correspondents are talking late into the night, trying to explain what it was like, what sights and smells haunt them, what they're proud of and what they regret, what they saw coming and what they didn't." (read the entire Washington Post Book World review)
"Review" by , "Never in the fifty years that I have been in or around the news business have I read a better record of a historic event than this."
"Review" by , "This should be required reading in every journalism class from high school to graduate school."
"Synopsis" by , The world's best known reporters tell the story of what really happened in Iraq in a gripping and gritty narrative history of the war.

Included are contributions from fifty international journalists, including Dexter Filkins, The New York Times correspondent who won widespread praise for his coverage of Fallujah; Rajiv Chandrassekaran, author of Imperial Life in the Emerald City; Anthony Shadid of the Washington Post, who won the Pulitzer Prize for his war coverage; Richard Engel of NBC; Anne Garrels of NPR, and other star reporters from both the print and broadcast world, not to mention their translators, photo journalists, and a military reporter.

All come together to discuss the war from its beginning on, and they hold back nothing on the violence they faced—Farnaz Fassihi of the Wall Street Journal talks about her near–kidnapping by "five men with AK–47s" chasing her car. ("I kept thinking, 'This is it.'") Nor do they hold back discussing how this impacted their work—British reporter Patrick Cockburn of The Independent notes that "One had to spend an enormous amount of time thinking about one's own security," and NPR reporter Deborah Amos observes that it was even more complicated for women: "As time went on we had to dress as Iraqi women, in the most conservative costumes Iraqi women would wear."

But perhaps the most fascinating—and chilling—observation is that most saw a disaster in Iraq unfolding long before they were allowed to report it. As Jon Lee Anderson of The New Yorker puts it, various governmental authorities and the media's own fears combined "to keep bad news away from the public," an observation supported by over 21 stunning, full–color photographs—many of which have never been published before due to such censorship.

Collected by the editors of America's most prestigious media monitor, the Columbia Journalism Review, such revelations make Reporting Iraq a fascinating and unique look at the war, as well as an important critique of international press coverage.

"Synopsis" by , “A searing document, one of the most revealing chronicles of the war yet published. It is as though correspondents are talking late into the night, trying to explain what it was like, what sights and smells haunt them, what they’re proud of and what they regret, what they saw coming and what they didn’t.”
—Anthony Swofford,The Washington Post

“Never in the fifty years that I have been in or around the news business have I read a better record of a historic event than this.”
—Reese Schonfeld, founding president of CNN

“This should be required reading in every journalism class from high school to graduate school.”
—James W. Crawley, president of Military Reporters and Editors

Following in the footsteps of best-selling books about the war, Reporting Iraq is a fully illustrated narrative history of the war by the world’s best-known reporters and photojournalists. Included are contributions from fifty journalists, including Dexter Filkins (the New York Timescorrespondent who won widespread praise for his coverage of Fallujah), Rajiv Chandrasekaran (author of Imperial Life in the Emerald City), Anthony Shadid (the Washington Postreporter awarded a Pulitzer Prize for his Iraq reporting), and Patrick Cockburn (from London’s Independent).

In this, the first book to tell the history of the war through the end of 2006, the deadliest period of conflict, we learn that most journalists saw a disaster in Iraq before they were allowed to report it. This revelation, along with hundreds of untold first-person stories, makes Reporting Iraq a fascinating look at the war and an important critique of international press coverage.

Reporting Iraqis published in conjunction with the Columbia Journalism Review, America’s premier media monitor and watchdog of the press in all its forms, from newspapers and magazines to radio, television, wire services, and the web.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.