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The Revolution of Every Day

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The Revolution of Every Day Cover

ISBN13: 9781935639640
ISBN10: 1935639641
Condition: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the midnineties, New York's Lower East Side contained a city within its shadows: a community of squatters who staked their claims on abandoned tenements and lived and worked within their own parameters, accountable to no one but each other. With gritty prose and vivid descriptions, Cari Luna's debut novel, The Revolution of Every Day, imagines the lives of five squatters from that time. But almost more threatening than the city lawyers and the private developers trying to evict them are the rifts within their community. Amelia, taken in by Gerrit as a teen runaway seven years earlier, is now pregnant by his best friend, Steve. Anne, married to Steve, is questioning her commitment to the squatter lifestyle. Cat, a fading legend of the downtown scene and unwitting leader of one of the squats, succumbs to heroin. The misunderstandings and assumptions, the secrets and the dissolution of the hope that originally bound these five threaten to destroy their homes as surely as the city's battering rams. The Revolution of Every Day shows readers a life that few people, including the New Yorker's who passed the squats every day, know about or understand.

Review:

"The appeal of squatters in lower Manhattan making their last stand against Giuliani will be apparent to anyone currently paying rent in New York County, but there's little more than '90s nostalgia at play in Luna's debut novel. Not that the residents of Thirteen House are models of DIY bliss: the tenement's heart and soul are the ex-junkie runaway, Amelia, and Gerrit, the partially deformed Dutch immigrant whose passion is rehabilitation — of electronics, old bikes and Amelia herself. With eviction imminent, Thirteen House's only ally is Cat House, named both for Cat, a faded scene queen, and the many felines she adopts. Other strays include Steve, the father of Amelia's baby, and his long-suffering wife, Anne. Not surprisingly, interpersonal politics are emphasized over the gentrification narrative, and a gloomy inevitability shadows the proceedings. 'A life without constraints — that had been the goal,' but these squatters' best days are clearly behind them. This novel gets points for not being Rent, but as a portrait of an era, it's still a romantic simplification populated by caricatures: the wasted punk-naïf, the disfigured father figure, the damaged matriarch. There's no revolution to be found in this novel, which feels far too prefab." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review:

"Cari Luna's novel is as heroic as her until-now-unsung characters. Salvaging the abandoned and derelict, rooting life in what before was barren waste, Luna's urban homesteaders exhibit the same valiance as Luna the novelist: she has rescued recent, all-but-forgotten history from beneath the bulldozers of 'progress'; she has breathed new life into a lost world." Susan Choi, author of My Education

Review:

“Cari Luna shines a light in the dark corners of New York that most people don't see. Her vivid portrayal of the squatters of Thirteenth Street and their fierce struggle to keep their community alive is an elegy for a city that no longer exists.” Elliott Holt, author of You Are One of Them

Review:

“Set in the dramatic world of the Lower East Side at the zenith of repeated waves of gentrification, The Revolution of Every Day manages to remain faithful to its own oceanic emotions. Much like the golden haze of an old photo, the novel evokes memory at its most transitory — inflected by hope, damaged by reality. Luna's love for the New York of this time and its complexities shows through on every page.” Vanessa Veselka, author of Zazen

Review:

“Cari Luna's The Revolution of Every Day is a bold, intrepid look into a world that when we are our lesser selves we would rather pass by than dwell in. But in this world, she finds devotion, loyalty, and, more eloquently, human relationships persisting in all their messiness, complexity, and glory. Like all great fiction, this novel will force us to reevaluate our perspective about the way things are and with more open hearts and minds consider how they ought to be; and by making us more tolerant, less provincial, and changing our mind-set, even if by degrees, it may make a difference when we reenter the vibrant but flawed society it portrays.” Ernesto Mestre-Reed, author of The Second Death of Unica Aveyano

Review:

"Cari Luna's beautiful, carefully rendered debut novel not only captures a specific moment in time in marvelous detail but also shows how our particular lives are moved by forces beyond us that we strive to understand and resist only at the greatest cost. A remarkable, unusual book."Emily Mitchell, author of The Last Summer of the World

Review:

"Cari Luna gets her hands dirty with her characters, digging deep and exposing vulnerable underbellies that some lesser writers might not dare explore. Masterful, precise, and utterly affecting, The Revolution of Every Day will change what you think about what makes a family, what makes a life, and how to love." Sara Shepard, author of Everything We Ever Wanted

Review:

"Cari Luna's beautifully written novel packs an emotional wallop for lifetime New Yorkers like me. I knew precious little about the Lower East Side squatters' movement while it was happening — my mistake. Luna makes a compelling case that flawed, wounded souls are often political visionaries. A major achievement." Susan Brownmiller, author of Against Our Will: Men, Women, and Rape

Review:

"Luna creates an array of complex characters caught up in emotions, relationships and situations far from the ordinary as they examine their commitment to their merged family and explore their own ideals and expectations. Enlightening and marked by inventive subject matter, intense reflection and stark eloquence." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Luna portrays the thorny, complicated relationships among addicts and runaways in various stages of recovery with riveting passion and heartrending realism." Booklist

Review:

"Excellent debut novel....Her characters are deeply sympathetic and richly drawn, portrayed as struggling New Yorkers first, political outliers second." LA Times Book Review

Review:

"The characters are superbly flawed, and Luna expertly leads us through their vastly different psyches and makes us understand them, even if we don't always sympathize. But just as much as it is a novel of characters, The Revolution of Every Day is the story of a city that's struggling with gentrification, as Cat puts it, 'All the way back to the Dutch and the Indians, yeah?'" Bust Magazine

Review:

"Luna shows how youthful dreams and a life lived just above the poverty line can ossify into something heart-breaking. 'They've been so busy surviving they haven't noticed their lives hardening around them, fixing them into place,' she writes about the oldest residents. 'They are now all they're ever going to be.' In the end, the novel examines how years of fighting for what you believe in both devastates and transforms, as each of these characters struggles to find a place to call home." O, The Oprah Magazine, Book of the Week

Review:

"[A] juicy read, filled with secret trysts, unexpected pregnancies and mysterious personal histories....Giuliani sent NYPD tanks (yes, they have tanks) into Alphabet City to oust the squatters who were responsible, at least in part, for making the neighborhood livable again, and while this is a fictional account, it truly takes you back to an earlier version of the same old New York struggle over class, space and the right to make a home for yourself in this city. Annaliese Griffin, Brooklyn Based

Review:

"Luna exposes us, with tenderness and eyes open wide, to the strange and vivid beauty of a time and place we may otherwise turn from. She provides us with a satisfying opportunity to explore a foreign world." The Oregonian, top 10 Northwest books of 2013

Review:

"Luna skillfully ties the plight of Thirteen House and its profoundly human residents to the gentrification of the city as a whole, illustrating how someone can feel at once completely part of a city, and powerless against it." The Portland Mercury

About the Author

Cari Luna received an MFA in fiction from Brooklyn College. Her short fiction has appeared in failbetter, Avery Anthology, PANK, and Novembre Magazine. New York-born, she now lives in Portland, OR, with her husband, their two children, a cat, and four chickens.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

sassy_spice1975, May 20, 2014 (view all comments by sassy_spice1975)
I've always been curious about squatting, especially after reading about Occupy Wall Street and The Tower of David in Venezuela. How do these people feel entitled to this space? What do they contribute? Cari Luna has shed light on these questions for me, while also exploring the interwoven lives of a group of people fighting to keep their home. Both arcs of the story are gripping, and told in a fresh way. Luna's unique voice gently pinpoints the most important bit of each page, like tiny spotlights. Highly recommended!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9781935639640
Author:
Luna, Cari
Publisher:
Tin House Books
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Edition Description:
Paperback, Deckle Edge
Publication Date:
20131015
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Pages:
392
Dimensions:
7.75 x 5 in

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Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Urban Life

The Revolution of Every Day Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$10.95 In Stock
Product details 392 pages Tin House Books - English 9781935639640 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The appeal of squatters in lower Manhattan making their last stand against Giuliani will be apparent to anyone currently paying rent in New York County, but there's little more than '90s nostalgia at play in Luna's debut novel. Not that the residents of Thirteen House are models of DIY bliss: the tenement's heart and soul are the ex-junkie runaway, Amelia, and Gerrit, the partially deformed Dutch immigrant whose passion is rehabilitation — of electronics, old bikes and Amelia herself. With eviction imminent, Thirteen House's only ally is Cat House, named both for Cat, a faded scene queen, and the many felines she adopts. Other strays include Steve, the father of Amelia's baby, and his long-suffering wife, Anne. Not surprisingly, interpersonal politics are emphasized over the gentrification narrative, and a gloomy inevitability shadows the proceedings. 'A life without constraints — that had been the goal,' but these squatters' best days are clearly behind them. This novel gets points for not being Rent, but as a portrait of an era, it's still a romantic simplification populated by caricatures: the wasted punk-naïf, the disfigured father figure, the damaged matriarch. There's no revolution to be found in this novel, which feels far too prefab." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Review" by , "Cari Luna's novel is as heroic as her until-now-unsung characters. Salvaging the abandoned and derelict, rooting life in what before was barren waste, Luna's urban homesteaders exhibit the same valiance as Luna the novelist: she has rescued recent, all-but-forgotten history from beneath the bulldozers of 'progress'; she has breathed new life into a lost world."
"Review" by , “Cari Luna shines a light in the dark corners of New York that most people don't see. Her vivid portrayal of the squatters of Thirteenth Street and their fierce struggle to keep their community alive is an elegy for a city that no longer exists.”
"Review" by , “Set in the dramatic world of the Lower East Side at the zenith of repeated waves of gentrification, The Revolution of Every Day manages to remain faithful to its own oceanic emotions. Much like the golden haze of an old photo, the novel evokes memory at its most transitory — inflected by hope, damaged by reality. Luna's love for the New York of this time and its complexities shows through on every page.”
"Review" by , “Cari Luna's The Revolution of Every Day is a bold, intrepid look into a world that when we are our lesser selves we would rather pass by than dwell in. But in this world, she finds devotion, loyalty, and, more eloquently, human relationships persisting in all their messiness, complexity, and glory. Like all great fiction, this novel will force us to reevaluate our perspective about the way things are and with more open hearts and minds consider how they ought to be; and by making us more tolerant, less provincial, and changing our mind-set, even if by degrees, it may make a difference when we reenter the vibrant but flawed society it portrays.”
"Review" by , "Cari Luna's beautiful, carefully rendered debut novel not only captures a specific moment in time in marvelous detail but also shows how our particular lives are moved by forces beyond us that we strive to understand and resist only at the greatest cost. A remarkable, unusual book."
"Review" by , "Cari Luna gets her hands dirty with her characters, digging deep and exposing vulnerable underbellies that some lesser writers might not dare explore. Masterful, precise, and utterly affecting, The Revolution of Every Day will change what you think about what makes a family, what makes a life, and how to love."
"Review" by , "Cari Luna's beautifully written novel packs an emotional wallop for lifetime New Yorkers like me. I knew precious little about the Lower East Side squatters' movement while it was happening — my mistake. Luna makes a compelling case that flawed, wounded souls are often political visionaries. A major achievement."
"Review" by , "Luna creates an array of complex characters caught up in emotions, relationships and situations far from the ordinary as they examine their commitment to their merged family and explore their own ideals and expectations. Enlightening and marked by inventive subject matter, intense reflection and stark eloquence."
"Review" by , "Luna portrays the thorny, complicated relationships among addicts and runaways in various stages of recovery with riveting passion and heartrending realism."
"Review" by , "Excellent debut novel....Her characters are deeply sympathetic and richly drawn, portrayed as struggling New Yorkers first, political outliers second."
"Review" by , "The characters are superbly flawed, and Luna expertly leads us through their vastly different psyches and makes us understand them, even if we don't always sympathize. But just as much as it is a novel of characters, The Revolution of Every Day is the story of a city that's struggling with gentrification, as Cat puts it, 'All the way back to the Dutch and the Indians, yeah?'"
"Review" by , "Luna shows how youthful dreams and a life lived just above the poverty line can ossify into something heart-breaking. 'They've been so busy surviving they haven't noticed their lives hardening around them, fixing them into place,' she writes about the oldest residents. 'They are now all they're ever going to be.' In the end, the novel examines how years of fighting for what you believe in both devastates and transforms, as each of these characters struggles to find a place to call home."
"Review" by , "[A] juicy read, filled with secret trysts, unexpected pregnancies and mysterious personal histories....Giuliani sent NYPD tanks (yes, they have tanks) into Alphabet City to oust the squatters who were responsible, at least in part, for making the neighborhood livable again, and while this is a fictional account, it truly takes you back to an earlier version of the same old New York struggle over class, space and the right to make a home for yourself in this city.
"Review" by , "Luna exposes us, with tenderness and eyes open wide, to the strange and vivid beauty of a time and place we may otherwise turn from. She provides us with a satisfying opportunity to explore a foreign world."
"Review" by , "Luna skillfully ties the plight of Thirteen House and its profoundly human residents to the gentrification of the city as a whole, illustrating how someone can feel at once completely part of a city, and powerless against it."
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