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Losing My Religion: How I Lost My Faith Reporting on Religion in America -- And Found Unexpected Peace

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Losing My Religion: How I Lost My Faith Reporting on Religion in America -- And Found Unexpected Peace Cover

ISBN13: 9780061626814
ISBN10: 0061626813
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

William Lobdell's journey of faith — and doubt — may be the most compelling spiritual memoir of our time. Lobdell became a born-again Christian in his late 20s when personal problems — including a failed marriage — drove him to his knees in prayer. As a newly minted evangelical, Lobdell — a veteran journalist — noticed that religion wasn't covered well in the mainstream media, and he prayed for the Lord to put him on the religion beat at a major newspaper. In 1998, his prayers were answered when the Los Angeles Times asked him to write about faith.

Yet what happened over the next eight years was a roller-coaster of inspiration, confusion, doubt, and soul-searching as his reporting and experiences slowly chipped away at his faith. While reporting on hundreds of stories, he witnessed a disturbing gap between the tenets of various religions and the behaviors of the faithful and their leaders. He investigated religious institutions that acted less ethically than corrupt Wall St. firms. He found few differences between the morals of Christians and atheists. As this evidence piled up, he started to fear that God didn't exist. He explored every doubt, every question — until, finally, his faith collapsed. After the paper agreed to reassign him, he wrote a personal essay in the summer of 2007 that became an international sensation for its honest exploration of doubt.

Losing My Religion is a book about life's deepest questions that speaks to everyone: Lobdell understands the longings and satisfactions of the faithful, as well as the unrelenting power of doubt. How he faced that power, and wrestled with it, is must reading for people of faith and nonbelievers alike.

Review:

"A former religion reporter for the Los Angeles Times, Lobdell recounts in this plainly written memoir how he became a Protestant evangelical, nearly accepted Catholicism and, in the end, rejected faith altogether. Central to the arc of this memoir is the unfolding sexual abuse scandal in the Roman Catholic Church, which Lobdell covered in depth during his time as a religion reporter, beginning in 2000. Despairing of the role of priests and bishops in that scandal, he refashions his identity as a crusading reporter out to cleanse the church of corrupt leaders. But after finding that his investigative stories about faith healer Benny Hinn and televangelists Jan and Paul Crouch appear to make no difference on the reach of these ministries or the lives of their followers, he gives up on the beat and on religion generally. Lobdell subjects his faith to the rigors of rationalism. If Christians are no more ethical than atheists, why belong to a church? It's a curious utilitarian argument that sounds more like a rearview explanation than a revealing account of loss of faith. Still, the memoir's strength lies in the wrenching emotional toll exacted by the Catholic abuse scandal. If nothing else, it suggests reporters may have been victimized by the scandal, too." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"A former religion reporter for the Los Angeles Times, Lobdell recounts in this plainly written memoir how he became a Protestant evangelical, nearly accepted Catholicism and, in the end, rejected faith altogether. Central to the arc of this memoir is the unfolding sexual abuse scandal in the Roman Catholic Church, which Lobdell covered in depth during his time as a religion reporter, beginning in 2000. Despairing of the role of priests and bishops in that scandal, he refashions his identity as a crusading reporter out to cleanse the church of corrupt leaders. But after finding that his investigative stories about faith healer Benny Hinn and televangelists Jan and Paul Crouch appear to make no difference on the reach of these ministries or the lives of their followers, he gives up on the beat and on religion generally. Lobdell subjects his faith to the rigors of rationalism. If Christians are no more ethical than atheists, why belong to a church? It's a curious utilitarian argument that sounds more like a rearview explanation than a revealing account of loss of faith. Still, the memoir's strength lies in the wrenching emotional toll exacted by the Catholic abuse scandal. If nothing else, it suggests reporters may have been victimized by the scandal, too." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Lobdell's heartfelt account is probably closer to the experience of many Americans whose doubts overwhelmed them, leading them reluctantly and after much soul-searching to disbelief." Library Journal

Review:

"It's not a cheerful conclusion, but Lobdell's honesty and self-effacement make it persuasive. An important wake-up call to people of faith." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

Lobdell's journey of faith — and doubt — is a book about life's deepest questions that speaks to everyone: the author understands the longings and satisfactions of the faithful, as well as the unrelenting power of doubt. How he faced that power, and wrestled with it, is must reading for people of faith and nonbelievers alike.

About the Author

William Lobdell has been a journalist for 25 years, winning many state and national awards. In 2008 he left the Los Angeles Times after a long tenure. He is on the visiting faculty at the University of California, Irvine. He is married with four boys.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

DLL, January 1, 2010 (view all comments by DLL)
Lobdell's book is informative, yet personal. It is brutal, yet fair. It will make you think and it will make you feel.

Lobdell shows just how good a journalist he is in his retelling of his discoveries, without a hint of arrogance. At the same time, he allows himself to step inside the story, admitting his humanity. He speaks with the quiet honesty of a man who comes to terms with his own doubts.

In a decade of political decisions deeply shaped by religion, Lobdell shows us exactly what dangers can lie at the intersection of faith and power.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780061626814
Author:
Lobdell, William
Publisher:
Collins Publishers
Author:
by William Lobdell
Author:
by William Lobdell
Subject:
Journalists
Subject:
Christian biography
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
General
Subject:
Religious
Subject:
Editors, Journalists, Publishers
Subject:
Journalists -- United States.
Subject:
Christian biography -- United States.
Subject:
Biography - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20090331
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 1.01 in 16.08 oz

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
Biography » Religious
Humanities » Philosophy » Atheism and Humanism
Religion » Christianity » General

Losing My Religion: How I Lost My Faith Reporting on Religion in America -- And Found Unexpected Peace Used Hardcover
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$15.95 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Collins - English 9780061626814 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "A former religion reporter for the Los Angeles Times, Lobdell recounts in this plainly written memoir how he became a Protestant evangelical, nearly accepted Catholicism and, in the end, rejected faith altogether. Central to the arc of this memoir is the unfolding sexual abuse scandal in the Roman Catholic Church, which Lobdell covered in depth during his time as a religion reporter, beginning in 2000. Despairing of the role of priests and bishops in that scandal, he refashions his identity as a crusading reporter out to cleanse the church of corrupt leaders. But after finding that his investigative stories about faith healer Benny Hinn and televangelists Jan and Paul Crouch appear to make no difference on the reach of these ministries or the lives of their followers, he gives up on the beat and on religion generally. Lobdell subjects his faith to the rigors of rationalism. If Christians are no more ethical than atheists, why belong to a church? It's a curious utilitarian argument that sounds more like a rearview explanation than a revealing account of loss of faith. Still, the memoir's strength lies in the wrenching emotional toll exacted by the Catholic abuse scandal. If nothing else, it suggests reporters may have been victimized by the scandal, too." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "A former religion reporter for the Los Angeles Times, Lobdell recounts in this plainly written memoir how he became a Protestant evangelical, nearly accepted Catholicism and, in the end, rejected faith altogether. Central to the arc of this memoir is the unfolding sexual abuse scandal in the Roman Catholic Church, which Lobdell covered in depth during his time as a religion reporter, beginning in 2000. Despairing of the role of priests and bishops in that scandal, he refashions his identity as a crusading reporter out to cleanse the church of corrupt leaders. But after finding that his investigative stories about faith healer Benny Hinn and televangelists Jan and Paul Crouch appear to make no difference on the reach of these ministries or the lives of their followers, he gives up on the beat and on religion generally. Lobdell subjects his faith to the rigors of rationalism. If Christians are no more ethical than atheists, why belong to a church? It's a curious utilitarian argument that sounds more like a rearview explanation than a revealing account of loss of faith. Still, the memoir's strength lies in the wrenching emotional toll exacted by the Catholic abuse scandal. If nothing else, it suggests reporters may have been victimized by the scandal, too." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Lobdell's heartfelt account is probably closer to the experience of many Americans whose doubts overwhelmed them, leading them reluctantly and after much soul-searching to disbelief."
"Review" by , "It's not a cheerful conclusion, but Lobdell's honesty and self-effacement make it persuasive. An important wake-up call to people of faith."
"Synopsis" by , Lobdell's journey of faith — and doubt — is a book about life's deepest questions that speaks to everyone: the author understands the longings and satisfactions of the faithful, as well as the unrelenting power of doubt. How he faced that power, and wrestled with it, is must reading for people of faith and nonbelievers alike.
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