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Depravity Disguised

Sexual Decoys: Gender, Race and War in Imperial Democracy by Zillah Eisenstein

Reviewed by Purnima Mankekar
Ms. Magazine

"As women gain more seats in public office, why is the world not a safer place for women (or, for that matter, for children and men), Zillah Eisenstein asks in Sexual Decoys. She suggests this is because some of these women, as well as some people of color, are sexual and racial decoys: They mask the damage caused by sexism, racism and avaricious forms of capitalism while also contributing to it. Pointing to the (in)famous examples of Condoleezza Rice and Colin Powell, she describes how the appointment of women and people of color to positions of power neither reflects a just social order nor results in one. Instead, as decoys, these individuals participate in the reinforcement or aggravation of the unequal and violent treatment of women and people of color...." Read the entire Ms. Magazine review.




6 Responses to "Depravity Disguised"

  1.  
    James Brian May 26th, 2007 at 11:34 pm

    Eisenstein's title is hilariously feminist-correct. Eisenstein's analysis is right-on. Hurrah for writers who see the obvious, and talk about it.

  2.  
    Steven Potts May 27th, 2007 at 12:02 am

    Eisenstein and the reviewer obviously have their political agenda in tack with the writing of the book and the review. Some of their attacks that they claim are racisit or feminist targets are clearly, to people who exam the circumstances and the full story, far from what is claimed. I give them credit for their creative interpretation of the situation and mark them both as history revisionists with their own agenda. As long as you accept that the book and review are interesting.

  3.  
    Katharine Daly May 27th, 2007 at 5:19 am

    Powells, you're wasting my pixels by featuring the mumblings of one inchoate malcontent about another.

  4.  
    ellis glazier May 27th, 2007 at 5:29 am

    the review of sexual decoys was right on. if the reviewer were correct, it is the book that is composed of gibberish.
    the writer took an off the wall idea and formed the world to fit within it. this is one way to do things. writing about facts not prejudices is another and better way.

    i suppose if one were to write for Ms magazine, one ought to say something for the worst far out to read.

  5.  
    M B West May 27th, 2007 at 11:38 pm

    The convenient thing about living in an illusory world of "-isms" and "-izations", as Zillah Eisenstein, Purnima Mankekar and their fellow academics do, is that you never have to say anything of substance about real things or real people. You can just sit there prattling on forever about your favourite "isms", like a child in the sandbox with his or her favourite toys, while the real world goes on, barely noticed, around you.

  6.  
    Mike Wittle May 28th, 2007 at 1:29 am

    oh, no! you mean it wasn't just those self-absorbed christian right uh, persons who were duped? the feminists were blindly ambitious too? so was Rosie, or Elizabeth, one of their clay-footed heroes? i'm usually confused about things, but the feminists always seemed so sure of themselves. the real estate market is still good , right?

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