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25 Remote Warehouse Music- Hip Hop and Rap

Pimps Up, Ho's Down: Hip Hop's Hold on Young Black Women

by

Pimps Up, Ho's Down: Hip Hop's Hold on Young Black Women Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Pimps Up, Ho's Down pulls at the threads of the intricately knotted issues surrounding young black women and hip hop culture. What unravels for Tracy D. Sharpley-Whiting is a new, and problematic, politics of gender. In this fascinating and forceful book, Sharpley-Whiting, a feminist writer who is a member of the hip hop generation, interrogates the complexities of young black women's engagement with a culture that is masculinist, misogynistic, and frequently mystifying.

Beyond their portrayal in rap lyrics, the display of black women in music videos, television, film, fashion, and on the Internet is indispensable to the mass media engineered appeal of hip hop culture, the author argues. And the commercial trafficking in the images and behaviors associated with hip hop has made them appear normal, acceptable, and entertaining — both in the U.S. and around the world.

Sharpley-Whiting questions the impacts of hip hop's increasing alliance with the sex industry, the rise of groupie culture in the hip hop world, the impact of hip hop's compulsory heterosexual culture on young black women, and the permeation of the hip hop ethos into young black women's conceptions of love and romance.

The author knows her subject from the inside. Coming of age in the midst of hip hop's evolution in the late 1980s, she mixed her graduate studies with work as a runway and print model in the 1990s. Her book features interviews with exotic dancers, black hip hop groupies, and hip hop generation members Jacklyn "Diva" Bush, rapper Trina, and filmmaker Aishah Simmons, along with the voices of many "everyday" young women.

Pimps Up, Ho's Down turns down the volume and amplifies the substance of discussions about hip hop culture and to provide a space for young black women to be heard.

Review:

"Here is a cultural paradox for you: Young, smart, seemingly self-confident women of color who put up with even the most raunchily misogynistic rap and hip-hop music. We're all familiar with the commercial and cultural trajectory of the music and how, since its emergence in gritty New York neighborhoods 25 years ago, it has become a global phenomenon, generating billions of dollars in sales and spawning... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"Pimps Up, Ho's Down provides a vital critical assessment of the sexual exploitation of women and girls all too prevalent in hip hop culture and in our larger society. This intelligent and sensitively written study is mandatory reading for those of us who must stop the violence." Darlene Clark Hine, co-author of A Shining Thread of Hope: The History of Black Women in America

Review:

"This compelling, well-researched — and alarming — account of how hip hop culture has impacted the lives and shaped the identities of young black women should be read by women and men of every generation." Paula Giddings, author of When and Where I Enter: The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America

Review:

"For B-girls who embrace both the brashness of Lil Kim and the pro-feminism of Lauryn Hill, Pimps Up, Ho's Down is an intellectual look at the intricate, diverse attitudes of young black women within the hip hop community. Sharpley-Whiting combines thought-provoking text with interviews that range from the rich (see Trina) to the regular (everyday women), giving a voice to todays complex and contradictory females within hip hop." The Source Magazine

Review:

"Clear and well written....It serves as a decent jumping-off point to discussions of young black women in our current society....Sharpley-Whiting has opened up the dialog, offering a source for research in a burgeoning area of study." Library Journal

Review:

"Sharpley-Whiting provides interesting anecdotes about the ways in which women are portrayed (and often used) within hip hop....[Her] insightful analyses [include] a particularly interesting discussion of the intersections of race, class, and capitalism in strip clubs." Bust Magazine

Review:

"In Pimps Up, Ho's Down, Sharpley-Whitings razor-sharp analysis turns an illuminating spotlight on the dark, complicated intersection where feminism and hip hop meet." Joan Morgan, author of When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost

Review:

I"n this bold critique of popular cultures stereotypical representations of hip hop, Tracy Sharpley-Whiting never wavers from her end goal of empowering the hip hop generation. Pimps Up, Ho's Down takes this discussion beyond the ivory tower and into the lives of everyday people." Bakari Kitwana, author of The Hip-Hop Generation

Review:

"Tracy Sharpley-Whitings groundbreaking book makes central the harsh sexist and racist realities that hip hop generation Black women face on a daily basis." Aishah Shahidah Simmons, Producer/Director of NO! (The Rape Documentary)

Review:

"[A] scathing account of how hip-hop, despite a few pluses, degrades black women....Sharpley-Whiting brings both street smarts and sophisticated cultural analysis to her subject." Philadelphia Inquirer

Synopsis:

2007 Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association Emily Toth Award

Pimps Up, Hos Down pulls at the threads of the intricately knotted issues surrounding young black women and hip hop culture. What unravels for Tracy D. Sharpley-Whiting is a new, and problematic, politics of gender. In this fascinating and forceful book, Sharpley-Whiting, a feminist writer who is a member of the hip hop generation, interrogates the complexities of young black women's engagement with a culture that is masculinist, misogynistic, and frequently mystifying.

Beyond their portrayal in rap lyrics, the display of black women in music videos, television, film, fashion, and on the Internet is indispensable to the mass media engineered appeal of hip hop culture, the author argues. And the commercial trafficking in the images and behaviors associated with hip hop has made them appear normal, acceptable, and entertaining - both in the U.S. and around the world.

Sharpley-Whiting questions the impacts of hip hop's increasing alliance with the sex industry, the rise of groupie culture in the hip hop world, the impact of hip hop's compulsory heterosexual culture on young black women, and the permeation of the hip hop ethos into young black women's conceptions of love and romance.

The author knows her subject from the inside. Coming of age in the midst of hip hop's evolution in the late 1980s, she mixed her graduate studies with work as a runway and print model in the 1990s. Her book features interviews with exotic dancers, black hip hop groupies, and hip hop generation members Jacklyn “Diva” Bush, rapper Trina, and filmmaker Aishah Simmons, along with the voices of many “everyday” young women.

Pimps Up, Hos Down turns down the volume and amplifies the substance of discussions about hip hop culture and to provide a space for young black women to be heard.

Synopsis:

While the Bosnian Muslims have for understandable reasons attracted a great deal of recent attention, other Muslim groups in the Balkans have escaped similar scrutiny. Bringing together leading specialists in the region to address this gap, this volume focuses on the question of Muslim identity in the contemporary Balkans. With the exception of the Bosnians, all of the Muslim communities of the former Yugoslavia are examined--the Sandzak, Kosovo and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM)--as well as those of Greece, Bulgaria, and Albania.

Combining a multidisciplinary approach not often found in studies of the Balkans with an accessible and readable format, this volume offers a detailed look at the religious, ethnic, and national identities of the Balkan Muslims and their relationships with the states in which they live.

About the Author

T. Denean Sharpley-Whiting is professor of African American and Diaspora Studies and French at Vanderbilt University, where she also directs the Program in African American and Diaspora Studies and serves as Director of the W. T. Bandy Center for Baudelaire and Modern French Studies. Author of four books, she was described by cultural critic and scholar Michael Eric Dyson as a rising "superstar" among black intellectuals and "one of the country's most brilliant and prolific racial theorists" in the Chicago Sun-Times in 2002. She has also co-edited three volumes, including The Black Feminist Reader.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments vii
Prologue
Sex, Power, and Punanny ix
Introduction
Pimpin' Aint Easy, But Somebody's Got to Do It 1

1 "I See the Same Ho": Video Vixens, Beauty Culture,
and Diasporic Sex Tourism 23
2 Too Hot to Be Bothered: Black Women
and Sexual Abuse 53
3 "I'm a Hustla, Baby": Groupie Love and
the Hip Hop Star 85
4 Strip Tails: Booty Clappin', P-poppin',
Shake Dancing 115
5 Coda, or a Few Last Words on Hip Hop
and Feminism 149

Notes 157
Index 167
About the Author 187

Product Details

ISBN:
9780814740149
Author:
Sharpley-Whiting, T. Denean
Publisher:
New York University Press
Author:
Taji-Farouki, Suha
Author:
Sharpley-Whiting, T. Denean Denean
Author:
Sharpley-Whiting, T.
Author:
Poulton, Hugh
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
Young women
Subject:
Sex role
Subject:
Women's Studies - General
Subject:
Genres & Styles - Rap & Hip Hop
Subject:
History & Criticism - General
Subject:
African-American women
Subject:
United States Social conditions 1980-
Subject:
History & Criticism *
Subject:
Rap
Subject:
Music-Hip Hop and Rap
Publication Date:
20070331
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
200
Dimensions:
8 x 5 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Rap and Hip-Hop
Arts and Entertainment » Music » History and Criticism
History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Womens Studies

Pimps Up, Ho's Down: Hip Hop's Hold on Young Black Women New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$30.95 In Stock
Product details 200 pages New York University Press - English 9780814740149 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Pimps Up, Ho's Down provides a vital critical assessment of the sexual exploitation of women and girls all too prevalent in hip hop culture and in our larger society. This intelligent and sensitively written study is mandatory reading for those of us who must stop the violence."
"Review" by , "This compelling, well-researched — and alarming — account of how hip hop culture has impacted the lives and shaped the identities of young black women should be read by women and men of every generation." Paula Giddings, author of When and Where I Enter: The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America
"Review" by , "For B-girls who embrace both the brashness of Lil Kim and the pro-feminism of Lauryn Hill, Pimps Up, Ho's Down is an intellectual look at the intricate, diverse attitudes of young black women within the hip hop community. Sharpley-Whiting combines thought-provoking text with interviews that range from the rich (see Trina) to the regular (everyday women), giving a voice to todays complex and contradictory females within hip hop."
"Review" by , "Clear and well written....It serves as a decent jumping-off point to discussions of young black women in our current society....Sharpley-Whiting has opened up the dialog, offering a source for research in a burgeoning area of study."
"Review" by , "Sharpley-Whiting provides interesting anecdotes about the ways in which women are portrayed (and often used) within hip hop....[Her] insightful analyses [include] a particularly interesting discussion of the intersections of race, class, and capitalism in strip clubs."
"Review" by , "In Pimps Up, Ho's Down, Sharpley-Whitings razor-sharp analysis turns an illuminating spotlight on the dark, complicated intersection where feminism and hip hop meet."
"Review" by , I"n this bold critique of popular cultures stereotypical representations of hip hop, Tracy Sharpley-Whiting never wavers from her end goal of empowering the hip hop generation. Pimps Up, Ho's Down takes this discussion beyond the ivory tower and into the lives of everyday people."
"Review" by , "Tracy Sharpley-Whitings groundbreaking book makes central the harsh sexist and racist realities that hip hop generation Black women face on a daily basis."
"Review" by , "[A] scathing account of how hip-hop, despite a few pluses, degrades black women....Sharpley-Whiting brings both street smarts and sophisticated cultural analysis to her subject."
"Synopsis" by , 2007 Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association Emily Toth Award

Pimps Up, Hos Down pulls at the threads of the intricately knotted issues surrounding young black women and hip hop culture. What unravels for Tracy D. Sharpley-Whiting is a new, and problematic, politics of gender. In this fascinating and forceful book, Sharpley-Whiting, a feminist writer who is a member of the hip hop generation, interrogates the complexities of young black women's engagement with a culture that is masculinist, misogynistic, and frequently mystifying.

Beyond their portrayal in rap lyrics, the display of black women in music videos, television, film, fashion, and on the Internet is indispensable to the mass media engineered appeal of hip hop culture, the author argues. And the commercial trafficking in the images and behaviors associated with hip hop has made them appear normal, acceptable, and entertaining - both in the U.S. and around the world.

Sharpley-Whiting questions the impacts of hip hop's increasing alliance with the sex industry, the rise of groupie culture in the hip hop world, the impact of hip hop's compulsory heterosexual culture on young black women, and the permeation of the hip hop ethos into young black women's conceptions of love and romance.

The author knows her subject from the inside. Coming of age in the midst of hip hop's evolution in the late 1980s, she mixed her graduate studies with work as a runway and print model in the 1990s. Her book features interviews with exotic dancers, black hip hop groupies, and hip hop generation members Jacklyn “Diva” Bush, rapper Trina, and filmmaker Aishah Simmons, along with the voices of many “everyday” young women.

Pimps Up, Hos Down turns down the volume and amplifies the substance of discussions about hip hop culture and to provide a space for young black women to be heard.

"Synopsis" by , While the Bosnian Muslims have for understandable reasons attracted a great deal of recent attention, other Muslim groups in the Balkans have escaped similar scrutiny. Bringing together leading specialists in the region to address this gap, this volume focuses on the question of Muslim identity in the contemporary Balkans. With the exception of the Bosnians, all of the Muslim communities of the former Yugoslavia are examined--the Sandzak, Kosovo and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM)--as well as those of Greece, Bulgaria, and Albania.

Combining a multidisciplinary approach not often found in studies of the Balkans with an accessible and readable format, this volume offers a detailed look at the religious, ethnic, and national identities of the Balkan Muslims and their relationships with the states in which they live.

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