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Twice Upon a Time: Women Writers and the History of the Fairy Tale

Twice Upon a Time: Women Writers and the History of the Fairy Tale Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Fairy tales, often said to be ''timeless'' and fundamentally ''oral,'' have a long written history. However, argues Elizabeth Wanning Harries in this provocative book, a vital part of this history has fallen by the wayside. The short, subtly didactic fairy tales of Charles Perrault and the Grimms have determined our notions about what fairy tales should be like. Harries argues that alongside these ''compact'' tales there exists another, ''complex'' tradition: tales written in France by the conteuses (storytelling women) in the 1690s and the late-twentieth-century tales by women writers that derive in part from this centuries-old tradition.

Grounded firmly in social history and set in lucid prose, Twice upon a Time refocuses the lens through which we look at fairy tales. The conteuses saw their tales as amusements for sophisticated adults in the salon, not for children. Self-referential, frequently parodic, and set in elaborate frames, their works often criticize the social expectations that determined the lives of women at the court of Louis XIV.

After examining the evolution of the ''Anglo-American'' fairy tale and its place in this variegated history, Harries devotes the rest of her book to recent women writers--A. S. Byatt, Anne Sexton, Angela Carter, and Emma Donoghue among them--who have returned to fairy-tale motifs so as to challenge modern-day gender expectations. Late-twentieth-century tales, like the conteuses', force us to rethink our conception of fairy tales and of their history.

Review:

"In this elegant study the scholar Elizabeth Wanning Harries gives their due to the counteuses — the 17th century French ladies...who entertained their salons with witty, sophisticated fantasies about imaginary princes and princesses....Harries suggests, with culture today fragmented into myriad products and market niches, fairy tales may be our only universal point of reference, the only cultural language we speak in common." Amanda Heller, The Boston Globe

Review:

"To read Harries's study is to have that all too rare experience of recognizing that this book needed to be written and is full of truths." Choice

Synopsis:

Grounded in social history, this text refocuses the lens through which we look at fairy tales. It examines the tales told by the "conteuses" (French story-telling women in the 1690s) and the late 20th-century tales by women writers that derive in part from this centuries-old tradition.

Synopsis:

"Professor Harries is very conversant with most of the pertinent literature for her topic, and she is an original thinker who is not afraid to question conventional assumptions about the development of the fairy tale. Her book will be useful to readers inside and outside the main field of scholarship."--Jack Zipes, University of Minnesota

"A significant contribution to cultural studies in its splendid elaboration of the French fairy-tale tradition and in its effort to connect that tradition with works ranging from Christa Wolf's Patterns of Childhood to Anne Sexton's Transformations. Harries's work fills the gaps in our knowledge about the conteuses and seeks to understand why the stories that emerged from French literary salons failed to remain in the canon even as they established the generic conventions of literary fairy tales."--Maria Tatar, Harvard University

Table of Contents

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS xi

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS xiii

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691074443
Subtitle:
Women Writers and the History of the Fairy Tale
Author:
Harries, Elizabeth Wanning
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Subject:
Women Authors
Subject:
Folklore & Mythology
Subject:
European - French
Subject:
Fairy tales
Subject:
American fiction
Subject:
French
Subject:
American Language and Literature
Subject:
Comparative Literature
Subject:
Gender Studies
Subject:
American literature
Publication Date:
20010820
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
14 halftones, 5 line illus.
Pages:
208
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

Twice Upon a Time: Women Writers and the History of the Fairy Tale
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Product details 208 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691074443 Reviews:
"Review" by , "In this elegant study the scholar Elizabeth Wanning Harries gives their due to the counteuses — the 17th century French ladies...who entertained their salons with witty, sophisticated fantasies about imaginary princes and princesses....Harries suggests, with culture today fragmented into myriad products and market niches, fairy tales may be our only universal point of reference, the only cultural language we speak in common."
"Review" by , "To read Harries's study is to have that all too rare experience of recognizing that this book needed to be written and is full of truths."
"Synopsis" by , Grounded in social history, this text refocuses the lens through which we look at fairy tales. It examines the tales told by the "conteuses" (French story-telling women in the 1690s) and the late 20th-century tales by women writers that derive in part from this centuries-old tradition.
"Synopsis" by , "Professor Harries is very conversant with most of the pertinent literature for her topic, and she is an original thinker who is not afraid to question conventional assumptions about the development of the fairy tale. Her book will be useful to readers inside and outside the main field of scholarship."--Jack Zipes, University of Minnesota

"A significant contribution to cultural studies in its splendid elaboration of the French fairy-tale tradition and in its effort to connect that tradition with works ranging from Christa Wolf's Patterns of Childhood to Anne Sexton's Transformations. Harries's work fills the gaps in our knowledge about the conteuses and seeks to understand why the stories that emerged from French literary salons failed to remain in the canon even as they established the generic conventions of literary fairy tales."--Maria Tatar, Harvard University

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