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Here are just some of the books we're talking about at Powell's.

  1. Vanishing Games

    The Ghostman returns in this thrilling, page-turning, whip-smart read. Hobbs has nailed it again with a story of jewel theft gone wrong set in the glittering casinos and crumbling slums of the gambling city of Macao.

    Recommended by Kathi Today, 11:16am


  2. The Last Ever After

    In the third and final volume of the School of Good and Evil series, Sophie and Agatha find themselves separated, only to face each other once again when Evil threatens to take over. The thrilling, twisting conclusion to this epic tale is one not to be missed.

    Recommended by Genevieve A. Today, 11:16am


  3. All This Life

    Mohr is a favorite of several Powell's employees, and his fifth novel does not disappoint. All This Life explores how a mass suicide affects the people who witnessed it, and the ripple effects that follow one teenager's posting of the event online. Mohr is a beautiful, dark, and funny writer, and his examination of our overly connected world is not to be missed.

    Recommended by Tessa Today, 11:15am


  4. What Pet Should I Get?

    Who better to explore the world of our most beloved friends — pets — than the equally beloved Dr. Seuss? With his signature kooky creatures and whimsical verse, this new, never-before-seen book is an enchanting way to learn about the dilemma of making up your mind.

    Recommended by Gigi Little Today, 11:12am


  5. Palimpsest: A History of the Written Word

    If you love the written word, then you'll love its rich history. Palimpsest traces the advancement of writing from Mesopotamia all the way up to the digital age, offering much more than a dry account: we learn as much about the cultural implications as we do about the changes in format and medium. Battles is a lovely writer, and Palimpsest is as entertaining as it is informative.

    Recommended by Abby Today, 11:11am


  6. On Writing

    No matter how you feel about the writing of Charles Bukowski, there's no denying he's become a much-emulated and lauded author of mid- to late-century American literature and poetry. This volume of Bukowski's letters to friends and colleagues reveals his thoughts on the process of creation in an intimate and open way.

    Recommended by Jen C. Today, 11:09am


  7. The Long Way Home

    Louise Penny continues her wonderful Chief Inspector Gamache series with this psychologically nuanced, elegantly plotted 10th installment. Gamache's neighbor Clara's husband has not come home as promised on the anniversary of their separation. As Gamache and Clara search for answers, The Long Way Home aptly showcases Penny's moral acuity and depth of feeling.

    Recommended by Tessa Today, 10:51am


  8. Circling the Sun

    Before she became a pilot, Beryl Markham trained racehorses, married twice, and was nearly eaten by a lion. Circling the Sun brings Markham to life in sparkling color, giving readers a fresh perspective on the beloved author of West with the Night. McLain effortlessly transports us to 1920s Kenya.

    Recommended by Mary Jo Today, 10:49am


  9. Poems New and Collected

    One of only 13 women to receive the Nobel Prize in Literature (out of 111 total laureates), Polish poet Wisława Szymborska (pronounced vees-WAH-vah shim-BOR-ska) was awarded the world's highest literary honor in 1996. A career-spanning work that features poems from eight separate collections, Poems New and Collected offers some four decades of the poet's finest verse. Despite having published only a few hundred poems during her lifetime, Szymborska was regarded as one of the century's finest European Poets. Described as the "Mozart of Poetry," Szymborska was recognized by the Nobel committee "for poetry that with ironic precision allows the historical and biological context to come to light in fragments of human reality." With rich imagery and a wide stylistic range, the profundity of Szymborska's poetry makes it personal, timeless, and universally relevant.

    Recommended by Jeremy Yesterday, 1:27pm


  10. To the Lighthouse

    Reading Virginia Woolf is like stepping out onto a veranda, where the entire world unfurls before you in dazzling detail. Her unparalleled ability to paint a scene so exquisitely, and to inhabit her characters with such clarity and intensity, makes for an experience that is both awe-inspiring and deeply moving. To the Lighthouse, set in a weathered vacation home on the edge of a Scottish isle, depicts lives shaped by the temperament of the environment and the ancient myths of the sea. People's moods change at whim, perspective passes fluidly from body to body, and the grandeur of the landscape beckons the characters to embark on a journey that proves epic voyages don't always involve great distances. It doesn't get more beautiful than this.

    Recommended by Renee P. Yesterday, 1:26pm


  11. Faces in the Crowd

    As sinuous a novel as Valeria Luiselli's Faces in the Crowd is, it is all the more remarkable on account of it being a debut — and a most assured one at that. The Mexican novelist and essayist's first fiction entwines multiple narratives and perspectives, shifting between them with the ease and gracefulness of a writer far beyond her years (Faces in the Crowd was published when Luiselli was 28). The metafictional scaffolding of Luiselli's novel is seamlessly constructed, and its bibliocentric façade entrenches it within a rich tradition of referential Latin American literature. Faces in the Crowd, beyond its gorgeous writing and superb composition, is modest yet striking, measured yet salient. Last fall, the National Book Foundation named Luiselli one of 2014's "5 under 35," and given the evident range of her myriad literary talents, it's no great wonder why.

    Recommended by Jeremy Yesterday, 1:26pm


  12. Song of Solomon

    If the only book you've read by Toni Morrison is her Pulitzer Prize–winning novel Beloved, you're missing out. Known for her powerfully evocative prose, her grand mystical tales steeped in black history, her haunting (and haunted) characters, Morrison is an author whose body of work demands attention. Her third novel, Song of Solomon — Barack Obama's self-proclaimed favorite book — is a magnificent, epic story following Macon "Milkman" Dead, along with an assortment of characters whose lives touch, and at times endanger, his own. Violence and a palpable fear of injustice pervades the people of this book, set in Michigan in the '30s through the '60s. But moreover, as the many characters emerge in full color for both Milkman and the reader, Song of Solomon is a book of awakenings, and a tale of one man's journey from defiance to action.

    Recommended by Renee P. Yesterday, 1:21pm


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