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Powell's Books for Home and Garden

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  2. Powell's Books for Home and Garden
    3747 SE Hawthorne Blvd.
    Portland, OR 97214 (map/directions) United States of America Work 503 228 4651 45.51236185397973, -122.62664794921875 Whether it's instructions for home and garden projects, inspiration for decorating and remodeling, or books on cooking and entertaining, Powell's Books for Home and Garden carries the latest to help enhance your nest. In addition to ideas to transform your space, we stock a wide range of books on crafts like knitting, jewelry making, and woodworking, as well as information on the latest approach to landscape design and gardening. Here you'll also find a unique selection of items from around the world: cooking utensils, tablecloths, garden tools and accessories, antique prints, quality dishware, and more. Plus, Powell's Books for Home and Garden is only two doors down from Powell's on Hawthorne, a quintessential general bookstore and hangout. About the Neighborhood The Hawthorne District lies across the Willamette River from downtown and is home to funky shops, restaurants, coffee houses, and pubs. Of Portland's neighborhoods, Hawthorne is "the bohemian." It reflects an urban niche where alternative is considered mainstream, and tie-dyes aren't a thing of the past. Here a hint of patchouli drifts from stores; a flower vendor brightens the sidewalk scenery; "art car" sightings are commonplace (cars decorated hood to trunk with treasures ranging from high-heeled shoes to bowling trophies); and trendsetters shop in hip used-clothing boutiques. On any given evening, live music spills from the open doors of pubs, bibliophiles linger at Powell's, and sidewalk tables host many a brew enthusiast. Brews, that is, as in beer and coffee.


    Phone
    503-228-4651

    Hours
    Monday - Saturday: 9:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.
    Sunday: 9:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.

    Sell Us Your Books:
    Sell your books just down the street at Powell's on Hawthorne.

Whether it's instructions for home and garden projects, inspiration for decorating and remodeling, or books on cooking and entertaining, Powell's Books for Home and Garden carries the latest to help enhance your nest. In addition to ideas to transform your space, we stock a wide range of books on crafts like knitting, jewelry making, and woodworking, as well as information on the latest approach to landscape design and gardening.

Here you'll also find a unique selection of items from around the world: cooking utensils, tablecloths, garden tools and accessories, antique prints, quality dishware, and more. Plus, Powell's Books for Home and Garden is only two doors down from Powell's on Hawthorne, a quintessential general bookstore and hangout.

About the Neighborhood

The Hawthorne District lies across the Willamette River from downtown and is home to funky shops, restaurants, coffee houses, and pubs. Of Portland's neighborhoods, Hawthorne is "the bohemian." It reflects an urban niche where alternative is considered mainstream, and tie-dyes aren't a thing of the past. Here a hint of patchouli drifts from stores; a flower vendor brightens the sidewalk scenery; "art car" sightings are commonplace (cars decorated hood to trunk with treasures ranging from high-heeled shoes to bowling trophies); and trendsetters shop in hip used-clothing boutiques. On any given evening, live music spills from the open doors of pubs, bibliophiles linger at Powell's, and sidewalk tables host many a brew enthusiast. Brews, that is, as in beer and coffee.

More about Powell's Books for Home and Garden: Directions to Powell's Books for Home and Garden


 

Here are just some of the books we're talking about at Powell's.

  1. The Broad Fork

    Hugh Acheson's The Broad Fork is Southern cooking by way of the farmer's market. Short chapters are devoted to one fresh ingredient, like broad beans, prepared in several simple, elegant ways. These humble broad beans with tomatoes and fatback were a huge hit at our potluck and would be a worthy summer accompaniment to grilled fish or chicken, or (my favorite) ladled generously over a bowl of olive-oil smashed potatoes.

    Recommended by Rhianna Walton July 10, 2015


  2. The Broad Fork

    The Broad Fork is from Southern chef Hugh Acheson — although he's actually Canadian. He followed his American wife to the South and fell in love with the food, so The Broad Fork has a touch of the American South in its recipes. Inspired by farmer's markets and community-supported agriculture boxes, he concentrates on recipes for the common and uncommon fruits and veggies likely to be landing in our kitchens this summer. (What do I do with green garlic, with a persimmon? What even is a ramp?) Each item of produce is given a number of recipes, which is extra helpful, as CSA boxes often come with an abundance of whatever is in season. Acheson's style is easygoing; I love a cookbook author who can claim to be imperfect and who is honest about having budget brand goods in their kitchen. (Jif, because his kids love it, and sliced American cheese because it's the best for melting on burgers.)

    Recommended by Tracey T. July 10, 2015


  3. A Modern Way to Eat

    Are we ever cooking from this cookbook! Author Anna Jones presents a fine, fat cookbook (352 pages) of creative vegetarian recipes. I've already made the Gentle Brown Rice — twice. Filled with nuts and loaded with aromatic spices, I've served this to guests and family alike. The second time I made the Gentle Brown Rice, I bought pork sausage to go into it, but then I thought better of it and left it out as the dish was perfect as presented. Also made by coworkers: Blueberry Pie Oatmeal, Cherry Poppy Seed Waffles, and Spiced Carrot and Cashew Salad. The salad was amazing; the roasted carrots with coconut cream were a delight for our whole office. We keep coming back to this book over and over again. It is awesome! A Modern Way to Eat is destined to be a vegetarian classic.

    Recommended by Tracey T. July 10, 2015


  4. Better on Toast

    What's not to love about yummy stuff on toast? I was excited to have chosen Better on Toast as my potluck recipe cookbook because of the sheer variety of delicious and exotic ingredient combinations. It was fun to try more than one recipe and bring it in for tasting, but it also spurred on some successful experimentation. For instance, a dollop of burrata (page 116) goes great on the Mushroom Hunks (page 141) and the Chipotle Eggplant (page 150).

    Recommended by Gigi Little July 10, 2015


  5. Better on Toast

    There is nothing as satisfying as a really good sandwich. Better on Toast celebrates the sandwich cousin, the open-faced sandwich. Author Jill Donenfeld ALWAYS starts with really good bread. (This isn't a baking book; it's all about the topping. Nevertheless, she includes one bread recipe — and a gluten-free recipe at that.) Step two in her sammie magic is pan grilling, or oven toasting the bread. The bread can be toaster-toasted as well, but you'll lose the delicious fatty seasoning. Step three: the star of the meal, the topping. Turning to a random page, we get: Fig Bagna Cauda and Watercress. Figs mixed with garlic and anchovies? What the...? Donenfeld states it's her favorite recipe in the book, and upon reading it, I can see how blending sweet figs with fishy anchovies could turn into a favorite. I love when a cook can see beyond expected flavors to make something fresh and new. Another random page brings a recipe for a demi-baguette topped with baked grapes and a cheese spread made of goat cheese and blue cheese. She suggests Humboldt Fog for the blue cheese. (Humboldt Fog is one of the keys to my heart.) Better on Toast has charmed the Powell's new book buying department, and I will not be surprised if one of its recipes shows up soon as a break-time snack.

    Recommended by Tracey T. July 10, 2015


  6. Genius Recipes

    It was so hard to choose a recipe from this wonderful cookbook knowing that each one comes from the best of the best. During the summer months, who better to advise on combining fresh veggies from the garden and the best way to cook them than Alice Waters. Her easy and heavenly version of ratatouille combines just the right amount of garlic and basil along with summer's bounty.

    Recommended by Kim T. July 10, 2015


  7. Genius Recipes

    Genius Recipes is from the popular food blog Food52. Kristen Miglore heads their column of near-perfect recipes culled from various sources: well-known chefs, bloggers, and cookbook authors. Here are some reasons why you'll want this cookbook:

    1. These recipes really are genius. They are tried and true; you can count on them.

    2. Miglore does a great job of explaining what is the genius in every recipe, and I love to know details behind how a recipe works.

    3. Miglore imbues her book with her personality. I take delight in the Chicken Thighs with Lemon recipe where she suggests: "Eat all the chicken as fast as you can."

    Coworker Mark brought in the Use a Spoon Chopped Salad, and now this recipe is another Powell's office favorite. The story behind this recipe: Paul Newman wanted a salad at his restaurant, The Dressing Room, to have a salad so finely chopped it could be eaten with a spoon. His chef built a salad of veggies, apple, vinegar, and goat cheese that conspire together for that umami balance.

    Recommended by Tracey T. July 10, 2015


  8. The Picnic

    First off, this is a beauty of a cookbook. The fruits and flowers on the cover are gently embossed. What is a picnic without a few ants? Don't miss the tiny guests at the bottom of the cover. This attention to detail is carried along throughout the book: Deviled Eggs with Chorizo Strips, Shocking-Pink Beet Hummus, Figs with Feta and Honey, Spicy Salted Olive Oil Brownies. Illustrations are sweet and enticing with a touch of sass. This cookbook covers pretty much all you need to plan a vivacious picnic, from picking your blanket and packing your bike to building your cocktail al fresco. The authors are experienced gourmet picnickers, come rain or come shine. (Rain is a covered topic in their book, page 26.) They are the founders of the Portland Picnic Society, which this year made the resolution to picnic each and every month, no matter how foul the weather. That is some admirable dedication to outdoor dining. (Not to drop any names, but I've met the authors a few times and they are all charming folk.)

    Recommended by Tracey T. July 10, 2015


  9. The Picnic

    The Picnic is like a hidden secret, full of wonderful summer food preparations and easy but innovative, already-familiar recipe ideas. For example, the salad on a stick is pure genius, and can be made and enjoyed anywhere — I put together the caprese variation at work in our kitchen, only moments before it was served!

    Recommended by Aubrey July 10, 2015


  10. Van Leeuwen Artisan Ice Cream

    The Brooklyn-based small-batch ice cream makers reveal the secrets of their amazing, all-natural recipes in this detailed and enticing book. From old favorites like vanilla and chocolate to exotic flavors such as black sesame, stout beer, and masala chai, there's something for everyone — vegans included!

    Recommended by Genevieve A. June 17, 2015


  11. Proof

    In Proof, Rogers distills the science and history of booze into a fascinating, thoroughly enjoyable book exploring alcohol's most basic elements (yeast, sugar, smell and taste) along with its neurological effects and even the dreaded hangover. You'll gain a new appreciation for one of humankind's most alluring creations.

    Recommended by Tate May 20, 2015


  12. The Dirty Apron Cookbook

    Chef Dave Robertson was born to teach cooking. Dirty Apron, the eponymous cookbook from his Vancouver, BC, deli and cooking school, celebrates recipes both funky and grand. Robertson's thoughtful presentation makes cooking easy for beginners yet also intriguing for the experienced cook. This is the rare cookbook that everyone will love.

    Recommended by Tracey T. April 8, 2015


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