25 Books to Read Before You Die
 
 

Q&A | August 19, 2014

Richard Kadrey: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Richard Kadrey



Describe your latest book. The Getaway God is the sixth book in the Sandman Slim series. In it, the very unholy nephilim, James Stark, aka Sandman... Continue »
  1. $17.49 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

spacer

Powell's Books on Hawthorne

  1.  Loading...

  2. Powell's Books on Hawthorne
    3723 SE Hawthorne Blvd.
    Portland, OR 97214 (map/directions) United States of America Work 503 228 4651 45.51214382316533, -122.62604981660843 From appropriately funky beginnings in a slightly funky neighborhood, Powell's on Hawthorne has grown into the largest used and new bookstore on Portland's east side. Located in a vibrant, diverse, and highly desirable neighborhood, Powell's on Hawthorne now covers more than 10,000 square feet of retail space and offers more than 200,000 used and new books. The atmosphere is relaxed, but the store is big enough to warrant a map. Not as extensive as the labyrinth at the City of Books, Powell's on Hawthorne is divided into just three rooms, each named for a neighborhood landmark: Madison, Hawthorne, and Tabor. The latter is named for Mt. Tabor, the world's only extinct volcano residing within city limits. Powell's on Hawthorne hosts lively and interesting author readings several times each week in its Tabor Room. Adjacent to the reading space, readers congregate in The Fresh Pot, an inviting corner of the store serving delicious homemade pastries and other sweet delights, along with some of the best coffee in a town that really knows its coffee. Judy Jewell says, "My favorite thing about working at the Hawthorne store is the lively feeling of community I get from my co-workers and customers. I think next best is the great used books we see here. You just never know what's going to turn up or who's going to turn up to buy it. Like the other day, we got in this copy of Huber the Tuber, a book about tuberculosis. We thought it was goofy and charming so we put it in the front window. That same afternoon, a customer snatched it up, saying it was her first book. Her father had been a lung doctor, and the book had come out when she was a toddler. She was way thrilled and we were all pretty tickled about it." --


    Phone
    503-228-4651

    Hours
    Monday - Thursday: 9:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.
    Friday - Saturday: 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m.
    Sunday: 9:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.

    Sell Us Your Books:
    Daily: 9:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.

From appropriately funky beginnings in a slightly funky neighborhood, Powell's on Hawthorne has grown into the largest used and new bookstore on Portland's east side.

Located in a vibrant, diverse, and highly desirable neighborhood, Powell's on Hawthorne now covers more than 10,000 square feet of retail space and offers more than 200,000 used and new books. The atmosphere is relaxed, but the store is big enough to warrant a map. Not as extensive as the labyrinth at the City of Books, Powell's on Hawthorne is divided into just three rooms, each named for a neighborhood landmark: Madison, Hawthorne, and Tabor. The latter is named for Mt. Tabor, the world's only extinct volcano residing within city limits.

Powell's on Hawthorne hosts lively and interesting author readings several times each week in its Tabor Room. Adjacent to the reading space, readers congregate in The Fresh Pot, an inviting corner of the store serving delicious homemade pastries and other sweet delights, along with some of the best coffee in a town that really knows its coffee.

Judy Jewell says, "My favorite thing about working at the Hawthorne store is the lively feeling of community I get from my co-workers and customers. I think next best is the great used books we see here. You just never know what's going to turn up or who's going to turn up to buy it. Like the other day, we got in this copy of Huber the Tuber, a book about tuberculosis. We thought it was goofy and charming so we put it in the front window. That same afternoon, a customer snatched it up, saying it was her first book. Her father had been a lung doctor, and the book had come out when she was a toddler. She was way thrilled and we were all pretty tickled about it." --

More about Powell's Books on Hawthorne: Directions to Powell's Books on Hawthorne


 

Here are just some of the books we're talking about at Powell's.

  1. Lila

    With Lila, Marilynne Robinson revisits her beloved town of Gilead, just as she did with Home. This time around, her focus is on Lila Ames, who in both previous novels has been a sort of paragon of calm and dignity. In Lila we learn about her childhood and young adulthood, which could not be further from calm or dignified. Lila lives through a childhood that begins in neglect and works its way through unceasing labor, abandonment, and the endless struggle for survival. Unexpectedly arriving in Gilead, Iowa, and meeting the Reverend John Ames, Lila's life is about to take another sharp turn. The Gilead/Home/Lila trilogy, read together, is a gorgeous, layered, nuanced look at small-town America, full of beauty and peace — truly home. Exploring themes of trust, family, rebirth, security, and love, Lila is stunning and beautiful. It's an intricate look at the complexities of the heart.

    Recommended by Dianah August 6, 2014


  2. The People in the Trees

    The People in the Trees has done a thorough job of rattling me to the core, and several months after reading it, I still can't stop thinking about it. The book has so many things I love: an unreliable narrator, explosive endings, secrets, unlikable characters, a scientific bent, cultural clashes, an arrogant hero, and ordinary life depicted realistically. This is a tough book to love, yet I do... and I don't. Rarely has a book had me so torn, but this one has, and in stereo. I want to beg everyone I know to read it, because I desperately need to talk through this amazing, crazy, bizarre story with someone. The last 75 pages are absolutely riveting; I could not put it down!

    Recommended by Dianah August 6, 2014


  3. Tangle Stitches for Quilters and Fabric Artists

    This is a great book for the quilter looking to bring something new to their craft. Zentangle is a style of doodling taken to an art form, and its practitioners are passionate about their repetitive pattern drawing. Tangle Stitches combines this art with quilting, a perfect fit as the doodles are very similar to common quilting stitches. The projects are mostly small and easy to manage.

    Recommended by Tracey T. August 5, 2014


  4. Farming with Native Beneficial Insects

    Looking to increase your organic harvest? This is one of the most exciting farming books I've seen! It's not just bugs (although there are plenty); it's also cover crops, grassed waterways, and brush piles. Farming with Native Beneficial Insects has a wealth of information on introducing and restoring biodiversity for the backyard farmer as well as for the farmer with actual acreage. It's from Storey, so you can count on lots of color pictures.

    Recommended by Tracey T. August 5, 2014


  5. Fourth of July Creek

    An enjoyable summer read — deeply textured story, characters that bear out their frail existence, and great writing.

    Recommended by Adrienne August 5, 2014


  6. Ruby

    Bond weaves a web of madness and ghosts in this scary and very disturbing read. I feel like the book needs a warning label: explicit and devastating scenes! Yet the story and Bond's writing are so astonishingly volcanic. One of the best books I have read this year.

    Recommended by Adrienne August 5, 2014


  7. California

    California by Edan Lepucki is an intelligent, intriguing, and thought-provoking novel about what the near future may be like. Human nature and relationships are highlighted as secrets are kept, yet inner thoughts are reflective and honest. A lazy summer read that I enjoyed throughout.

    Recommended by Adrienne August 5, 2014


  8. Against Football

    Growing up in Pittsburgh in the 1970s, it was impossible not to be a football fan. But like Steve Almond, I've struggled with its morality. The case he makes against the game is rational, compelling, and impossible to ignore. He won't win any popularity contests by addressing this difficult subject, but my hope is that it will spur a debate that is long overdue.

    Recommended by Shawn D. August 5, 2014


  9. The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace

    On one level, The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace is about unfulfilled potential and heartbreaking loss, but more importantly it deals with the pressure we all feel to succeed and be happy in an increasingly competitive society. It is a beautiful eulogy to a friend and an accurate portrayal of what it means to be young, talented, and conflicted.

    Recommended by Shawn D. August 5, 2014


  10. A History of the Paper Pattern Industry

    A History of the Paper Pattern Industry is a joy for any follower of fashion history. I've often been fascinated by how the early days of modern fashion (starting around the 1850s) followed developments in technology. Whether it's the maturation of the sewing machine, the development of chemical dyes for superior color, or the increase of factory jobs for women, the late 1800s and early 1900s were an amazing time in clothing. What I hadn't taken into consideration was how much paper patterns also played into modern fashion history. A History of the Paper Pattern Industry is concerned primarily with U.S. paper pattern history, while filled with plenty of depictions of pattern envelopes. No doubt the designer/sewist will find inspiration here, but this is really more of a sociological study of the pattern business.

    Recommended by Tracey T. August 5, 2014


  11. One-Hour Cheese

    This fantastic cheese-making cookbook from Portland's own indie crafter is so easy to use it's almost hard to believe. Almost. I've made yummy cheese from the step-by-step photo recipes in it several times now, thanks to Claudia's simple, encouraging instructions. This book boasts 16 varieties of fun cheese recipes to try, all in one hour or under. There's an assortment of cheese accompanying recipes in the back as well. I recommend this wonderful book to all dairy lovers!

    Recommended by Aubrey August 5, 2014


  12. Indonesia, Etc.

    Indonesia is interesting in its own right, but in Elizabeth Pisani's joyful hands, this improbable nation of 13,466 islands spanning over 3,300 miles becomes a fascinating cautionary tale about the benefits, limits, and dangers of enforcing a national identity. Pisani has spent many years living and working in Indonesia, and her historical and political insights and anecdotes are sharp, funny, and sympathetic, grounded in the oftentimes perplexing reality of island life. I found myself coveting her temerity as she island-hops, rides her motorbike up volcanoes, has tea with a corpse (twice), and participates in village rituals. She's optimistic but keenly aware of the nation's flaws; likewise, although many of her stories are hilarious and strange, they're also respectful — this never devolves into a "how weird are the Indonesians" travel piece. This book is wonderful and witty — a perfect pick for the Jared Diamond fan with wanderlust.

    Recommended by Rhianna Walton August 5, 2014


spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.