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Powell's City of Books

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  2. Powell's City of Books
    1005 W Burnside St. between 10th and 11th Ave.
    Portland, OR 97209 (map/directions) United States of America Work 503 228 4651 45.52306687976776, -122.68125772476196 About Powell's City of Books: Powell's City of Books is a book lover's paradise, the largest used and new bookstore in the world, open 365 days a year. Located in downtown Portland, Oregon, and occupying an entire city block, the City stocks more than a million new and used books. Nine color-coded rooms house over 3,500 different sections, offering something for every interest, including an incredible selection of out-of-print and hard-to-find titles. Each month, the Basil Hallward Gallery (located upstairs in the Pearl Room) hosts a new art exhibit, as well as dozens of author events featuring acclaimed writers, artists, and thinkers such as Roddy Doyle, Joyce Carol Oates, Michael Chabon, Annie Leibovitz, and President Jimmy Carter. Visit The Espresso Book Machine® in the Purple Room to publish your own book or print hard-to-find titles, all in the time it takes to make a cup of coffee. The City's Rare Book Room gathers autographed first editions and other collectible volumes for readers in search of a one-of-a-kind treasure. Every day at our buyers' counter in the Orange Room, we purchase thousands of used books from the public. Powell's purchases special collections, libraries, and bookstore inventories as well. A few store facts: • 68,000 square feet packed with books. • We buy 3,000 used books over the counter every day. • Approximately 3,000 people walk in and buy something every day. • Another 3,000 people just browse and drink coffee. • We stock 122 major subject areas and more than 3,500 subsections. • You'll find more than 1,000,000 volumes on our shelves. • Approximately 80,000 book lovers browse the City's shelves every day in Portland and via the Internet. If you've already placed an order for a book via our website and would like to check on its status, please email us at help@powells.com. More about Powell's City of Books: Store Map (PDF)Directions to Powell's City of BooksWorld Cup Coffee & Tea at Powell's City of BooksThe Rare Book Room


    Phone
    503-228-4651

    Hours
    Daily: 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m.

    Sell Us Your Books:
    Daily: 9:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.

    Rare Book Room:
    Daily: 11:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.

About Powell's City of Books:

Powell's City of Books is a book lover's paradise, the largest used and new bookstore in the world, open 365 days a year. Located in downtown Portland, Oregon, and occupying an entire city block, the City stocks more than a million new and used books. Nine color-coded rooms house over 3,500 different sections, offering something for every interest, including an incredible selection of out-of-print and hard-to-find titles.

Each month, the Basil Hallward Gallery (located upstairs in the Pearl Room) hosts a new art exhibit, as well as dozens of author events featuring acclaimed writers, artists, and thinkers such as Roddy Doyle, Joyce Carol Oates, Michael Chabon, Annie Leibovitz, and President Jimmy Carter.

Visit The Espresso Book Machine® in the Purple Room to publish your own book or print hard-to-find titles, all in the time it takes to make a cup of coffee.

The City's Rare Book Room gathers autographed first editions and other collectible volumes for readers in search of a one-of-a-kind treasure.

Every day at our buyers' counter in the Orange Room, we purchase thousands of used books from the public. Powell's purchases special collections, libraries, and bookstore inventories as well.

A few store facts:

• 68,000 square feet packed with books.
• We buy 3,000 used books over the counter every day.
• Approximately 3,000 people walk in and buy something every day.
• Another 3,000 people just browse and drink coffee.
• We stock 122 major subject areas and more than 3,500 subsections.
• You'll find more than 1,000,000 volumes on our shelves.
• Approximately 80,000 book lovers browse the City's shelves every day in Portland and via the Internet.

If you've already placed an order for a book via our website and would like to check on its status, please email us at help@powells.com.

More about Powell's City of Books:

Store Map (PDF)Directions to Powell's City of BooksWorld Cup Coffee & Tea at Powell's City of BooksThe Rare Book Room


 

Here are just some of the books we're talking about at Powell's.

  1. The Book of Strange New Things

    Full disclosure: I was mourning a very recent loss when I read Michel Faber's latest (and I'm told, last) novel, so the effect it had on me may have been amplified by my own grief. Still, this book carved a hole in me the way really good books do, and I don't think it's just because I happened to be sad at the time. Through a narrative I probably would have avoided, were it not for the ravings of my coworkers, Faber lands a solid emotional punch, rendering faith, despair, wonder, and longing with equal skill. It's a preternaturally beautiful story, and if it is indeed Faber's last novel, a lovely note on which to end his career.

    Recommended by Tove May 1, 2015


  2. Small Backs of Children

    Lidia Yuknavitch revisits the aching wound of her stillborn child in The Small Backs of Children. While fiction, this moving novel reads like nonfiction — it is so personal. Yuknavitch has the rare and almost magical ability to write beautifully about things that are horrific. Gathering together the stories of several characters, each playing a part in an elaborate plot to save their friend, Yuknavitch delivers a gorgeous, heartbreaking tale of friendship, guilt, redemption, and healing.

    Recommended by Dianah April 29, 2015


  3. Magonia

    A heady mashup of realistic fiction and fantasy. Aza has been ill for much of her life, but no one understands why. Turns out that she isn't human and her species doesn't do well on Earth. Told in chapters alternating between Aza and her close friend Jason, these two strong narrative voices combine to relate Aza's story in a compelling and fresh way.

    Recommended by Mary Jo April 29, 2015


  4. An Ember in the Ashes

    Told from two points of view — Laia, a slave; and Elias, a reluctant captor — this compelling novel depicts the characters' colliding worlds and the myriad other people they encounter, from the rebels and the slaves to the rulers of the empire. It will leave you breathless waiting for the second book in the series.

    Recommended by Richard C. April 29, 2015


  5. The Opposite of Loneliness

    In 2012, Marina Keegan wrote a commencement essay for her college newspaper called "The Opposite of Loneliness." A few days after graduating magna cum laude from Yale, she died in a car accident. This deeply moving posthumous collection contains that hopeful essay along with a mix of other writings from a talent whose work continues to inspire.

    Recommended by Abby April 29, 2015


  6. Missoula

    Any new release by Krakauer is bound to be controversial, but with Missoula, a look at campus rape across America, he's created a lightning rod for vigorous debate. Well-written and incredibly thought-provoking, Missoula uses a broad array of case studies and interviews to assess the campus rape problem and explore the troubling mechanics of our justice system.

    Recommended by Rhianna Walton April 29, 2015


  7. God Help the Child

    In Morrison's newest novel, the past is always bubbling below the surface, whether it is the culturally ingrained value placed on specific shades of skin tone or a personal history of child abuse and neglect. In true Morrison fashion, this book is not only readable and engaging, but it leaves you changed.

    Recommended by Lizzy April 29, 2015


  8. The China Mirage

    Bradley's prior histories reveal remarkable truths about America's often-overlooked imperial past. With The China Mirage he presents a provocative take on U.S.–China relations from the 19th century through World War II.

    Recommended by Ted April 29, 2015


  9. Hausfrau

    A scorching character study, along with an examination of infidelity and modern-day ennui, Hausfrau exposes the ease of deceit, the disregard for compassion, and the stifling boredom that can so easily consume. Anna, an American living in Switzerland with her husband and three children, is utterly disengaged from her colorless life. Capricious and erratic, Anna moves from one sticky situation to another and cannot seem to manage her moods or her life. Like a contemporary Madame Bovary or Anna Karenina, Hausfrau follows the internal angst and unease of a woman on the brink of disaster. Impeccably written, Jill Alexander Essbaum's novel is a brilliant victory of literary skill.

    Recommended by Dianah April 24, 2015


  10. Our Souls at Night

    Elderly and widowed, small-town residents Louis and Addie begin a timid, slow affair in order to stave off their solitude. They've both reached the point in their lives when gossip and rumor pale in comparison to the almost desperate need of filling in this aching hole of loneliness. However, as their love cautiously blooms, they begin to feel pressure from outside sources, particularly Addie's son. Just at the point when they realize their relationship is vital to their happiness, it becomes clear that there may be consequences and casualties — things they are not at all ready to face.

    Told in quiet, calm prose, Haruf's posthumous novel is a small but powerful study on human connection, companionship, and love. Just lovely.

    Recommended by Dianah April 21, 2015


  11. Tampa

    This blistering excavation of the mind of a pedophile is absolutely riveting. Celeste Price becomes a teacher and carefully arranges her life in order to continuously have a fresh supply of young boys on hand. Her entire life revolves around her anticipatory, and then eventual, conquests, and her introspection never once goes beyond her insatiable libido.

    Her stunning physical beauty seems to deflect the accusations that are eventually directed her way, and Tampa morphs into a damning commentary on the worth of females based solely on their appearance. She can't possibly be that beautiful and be "bad," can she? Nutting somehow manages to make sure that her readers are both attracted to, and repulsed by, Celeste, and provides one hell of a wild ride. Excellent!

    Recommended by Dianah April 15, 2015


  12. Cadillac Desert

    Almost 30 years since its original publication, this absorbing, no-holds-barred condemnation of water policy in the American West remains an essential book for understanding our current water crisis, with California grappling with the most severe drought in recent history and the threat of global water shortages growing ever more real. Reisner reveals how the West's transformation from a barren landscape to a lush paradise is the result of corruption, greed, and devastating environmental practices that have plagued a vast region of the country for well over a century. Regardless of where you live, this is vital reading on our most precious resource.

    Recommended by Abby April 14, 2015


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Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.