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Original Essays | September 4, 2014

Edward E. Baptist: IMG The Two Bodies of The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism



My new book, The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism, is the story of two bodies. The first body was the new... Continue »
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Powell's Press

Powell's Press, the publishing arm of Powell's Books, is committed to making out-of-print titles by renowned Oregon authors once again available nationally. In conjunction with The Oregon Cultural Heritage Commission, we're proud to present our first two: The Country Boy by Silverton cartoonist Homer Davenport and Six Red Months in Russia by Louise Bryant.

The Country Boy Six Red Months in Russia
The Country Boy
by Homer Davenport

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Originally published in 1910, The Country Boy is an Oregon classic of small town American life by Silverton cartoonist Homer Davenport. This charming and humorous account was written by the 43-year-old author at the height of his fabulous career to recapture the memories evoked by his beloved hometown.

"Davenport's The Country Boy belongs on the shelf with Mark Twain's books." The Cleveland Leader, 1912

"Homer Davenport (1867-1912), the Silverton cartoonist, is one of Oregon’s most extraordinary celebrities. Through the support of formidable newspaperman William Randolph Hearst, he would become the most influential political cartoonist in the U.S.A. One might argue that he had more impact on the American way of life than radical journalist John Reed or poet-lawyer C.E.S. Wood, both Oregonians and players on the national scene.” From the Introduction by Walt Curtis

“Davenport has kept up all his life the early habit of studying men and affairs and he knows everybody worth knowing all over the country.... The spirit of his cartoons represents his real thought and is not the product of hire. He is such a delightful talker that in any group of men he becomes the center.” The New York Times

Introduction
Homer Davenport – Oregon's Great Cartoonist by Walt Curtis

Homer Davenport (1867-1912), the Silverton cartoonist, is one of Oregon's most extraordinary celebrities. Through the support of formidable newspaperman William Randolph Hearst, he would become the most influential political cartoonist in the U.S.A. Millions saw his cartoons. Hearst used his darling "Davvy" as a point man muckraking against political bosses and big trusts such as Standard Oil Company... (read more)

Six Red Months in Russia
by Louise Bryant

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“The narrative of Six Red Months in Russia is engrossing and vivid. While few might admit it, many historians of this period seem to have relied more heavily on [Louise] Bryant’s account than on [husband John Reed’s] Ten Days. Her sweep was large: she described her journey into Russia, conditions in Petrograd, the tense atmosphere at the Winter Palace before its overthrow, the formation of the constituent assembly, the state of the military camps, free speech in the new regime, the decline of the church, and even her journey out of Russia by way of Sweden. Little escaped her eye.” From the new preface by Mary Dearborn

“Miss Bryant appears a demure and pretty girl, with a large hat, a stylish suit and gray stockings. Her voice is high but has a plaintive note to it. She amuses the crowd, because, with the air of an ingénue, she hurls darts at Government departments, holds people up to ridicule, and with a fearful voice appeals to American fair play to be just to a beneficent Bolshevist Government and give it a chance....In the burst of applause the demure little speaker sits down.” The New York Times, March, 1919

“Despite her exposure to the Russian revolution, Louise has changed little….Aside from the George Sand haircut, she is the same little radicalist and vigorous performer that left Portland three years ago.” The Oregonian, April 3, 1919

Preface
Reviving Louise Bryant
by Mary Dearborn

Louise Bryant's name is nearly forgotten in American history books, effaced by any number of historians for a wide variety of reasons. Much information about the life of this remarkable and courageous journalist, who carved out a vivid and extraordinary life for herself, has nearly been lost to the record. Many of the facts of her life are unknown, partly because, in re-creating herself as a twentieth-century American heroine... (read more)

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