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Relativity: The Special and the General Theory

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Synopses & Reviews

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Publisher Comments:


What could be better than an introduction to the theory of relativity by Albert Einstein's original text, written for the layperson nearly a century ago, with insights from today's leading experts.

Experts shattered common-sense notions of space and time with the publication of his special theory of relativity in 1905. In the general theory of relativity, published in 1916, he extended the special theory to include gravity, supplanting Newton's law of universal gravitation, the zenith of the Scientific Revolution. In Relativity: The Special and General Theory, Einstein took his revolutionary theory directly to the people. In simple terms, he carefully laid out the basic concepts of relativity. But almost ninety years have passed since Einstein penned this classic; many advances have been made in our understanding of relativity and space and time.

Robert Geroch, one of the world's preeminent experts on relativity, builds on Einstein's work with commentary that addresses the ideas at the heart of the theory, bringing a modern understanding of relativity to the text. He elucidates how special relativity is a reconciliation of the contradictions between the nature of light and the principle of relativity (a long-standing tenet of physics known since Galileo's time); he expands on Einstein's treatment of the geometry of space-time and the fundamental notion of an "event"; he explains in detail, but without technical language, the equivalence of inertial and gravitational mass, a cornerstone of general relativity.

Book News Annotation:

This republication of Albert Einstein's introduction to his theory of relativity, written for the layperson, includes commentary by Robert Geroch (physics, University of Chicago) on the modern understanding of relativity, plus an introduction by Robert Penrose (mathematics, emeritus, Oxford University), framing Einstein's work within the history of science, and an essay on the cultural legacy of relativity theory by David C. Cassidy (natural sciences, Hofstra University). Einstein's preface, 32 chapters, and three appendices were originally published in 1920. The original version of Roger Penrose's introduction was first published in 2004 by The Folio Society Ltd.
Annotation 2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Book News Annotation:

This republication of Albert Einstein's introduction to his theory of relativity, written for the layperson, includes commentary by Robert Geroch (physics, University of Chicago) on the modern understanding of relativity, plus an introduction by Robert Penrose (mathematics, emeritus, Oxford University), framing Einstein's work within the history of science, and an essay on the cultural legacy of relativity theory by David C. Cassidy (natural sciences, Hofstra University). Einstein's preface, 32 chapters, and three appendices were originally published in 1920. The original version of Roger Penrose's introduction was first published in 2004 by The Folio Society Ltd. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

"It is remarkable that Einstein should have produced such an account for the lay public so soon after his general theory was completed. This view has now superbly survived the tests of time.... In this new edition we are fortunate in having the advantage of an excellent exposition of Einstein' s foundational ideas on relativity from a more modern perspective in Robert Geroch' s commentary."--From the Introduction by Roger Penrose, author of The Emperor' s New Mind and The Road To Reality.

"One good way to get a feeling for what relativity theory is all about is to read, in these pages, what the originator of the subject had to say. I have provided comments, attached to various sections of Einstein' s book. The key to understanding relativity is to think about it for yourself."--From the Commentary by Robert Geroch, Professor of Physics, University of Chicago.

"Relativity was a highly technical new theory that gave new meanings to familiar concepts and even to the nature of theory itself. The general public looked upon relativity as indicative of the seemingly incomprehensible modern era, educated non-scientists despaired of ever understanding what Einstein had done, and political ideologues used the new theory to exploit public fears and anxieties--all of which opened a rift between science and the broader culture that continues to expand today."--From the Historical Essay by David C. Cassidy, author of J. Robert Oppenheimer and the American Century, and Einstein and Our World.

"All religions, arts and sciences are branches of the same tree. All these aspirations are directed toward ennobling man' s life, lifting it from the sphere of mere physicalexistence and leading the individual toward freedom."--Albert Einstein

What could be better than an introduction to the theory of relativity by Albert Einstein himself? One that combines Einstein' s original text, written for the layperson nearly a century ago, with insights from today' s leading experts.

Einstein shattered common-sense notions of space and time with the publication of his special theory of relativity in 1905. In the general theory of relativity, published in 1916, he extended the special theory to include gravity, supplanting Newton' s law of universal gravitation, the zenith of the Scientific Revolution. In Relativity: The Special and General Theory, Einstein took his revolutionary theory directly to the people. In simple terms, he carefully laid out the basic concepts of relativity. But almost ninety years have passed since Einstein penned this classic; many advances have been made in our understanding of relativity and space and time.

Robert Geroch, one of the world' s preeminent experts on relativity, builds on Einstein' s work with commentary that addresses the ideas at the heart of the theory, bringing a modern understanding of relativity to the text. He elucidates how special relativity is a reconciliation of the contradictions between the nature of light and the principle of relativity (a long-standing tenet of physics known since Galileo' s time); he expands on Einstein' s treatment of the geometry of space-time and the fundamental notion of an "event"; he explains in detail, but without technical language, the equivalence of inertial and gravitational mass, a cornerstone of general relativity.

Roger Penrose' seloquent introduction frames the creation of both the special and the general theories in the history of science. He argues that even without Einstein, the special theory would have been formulated, as its essential ideas had been put forward before 1905. But the general theory, he shows, is so unique and revolutionary that, without Einstein, we still may not have it today. He also discusses important developments in general relativity since Einstein' s death, and the significance of the theory from the vantage point of contemporary science.

David C. Cassidy explores the impact of relativity outside of physics. In a century of unprecedented scientific advances, yet one of great turmoil, violence, and disillusionment, relativity became a tool of ideologies. Cassidy shows that while the theory reinforced the idea of scientific progress for some, the counterintuitive nature of the theory alienated many nonscientists, opening a rift between science and the public that continues to grow today.

Fully updated 100 years after Einstein published his first papers on relativity, this classic account by the man himself is now ready for twenty-first century readers.

(c) Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

Robert Geroch builds on Einstein's work with commentary that addresses the ideas at the heart of the theory, bringing a modern understanding of relativity to the text. He elucidates how special relativity is a reconciliation of the contradictions between the nature of light and the principle of relativity; he expands on Einstein's treatment of the geometry of space-time and the fundamental notion of an "event"; he explains in detail, but without technical language, the equivalence of inertial and gravitational mass, a cornerstone of general relativity.

About the Author

Roger Penrose is a world-renowned physicist at Oxford University. He is the author of The Road to Reality.

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), one of the greatest thinkers of the twentieth century, was born in Ulm, Germany, to German-Jewish parents. He published his first great theories in Switzerland in the early 1900s while working as a patent clerk.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780131862616
Subtitle:
The Special and the General Theory
Translator:
Lawson, Robert W.
Translator:
Lawson, Robert W.
Essay by:
Cassidy, David C.
Essay:
Cassidy, David C.
Author:
Einstein, Albert
Author:
Penrose, Roger
Essay:
Cassidy, David C.
Publisher:
Dutton Adult
Subject:
Physics
Subject:
Relativity (physics)
Subject:
Relativity
Subject:
Physics-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
B-Hardcover
Publication Date:
April 2005
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.7 x 1.02 in 0.9 lb
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Science and Mathematics » Physics » General
Science and Mathematics » Physics » Relativity Theory

Relativity: The Special and the General Theory Used Hardcover
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Product details 288 pages Pi Press - English 9780131862616 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "It is remarkable that Einstein should have produced such an account for the lay public so soon after his general theory was completed. This view has now superbly survived the tests of time.... In this new edition we are fortunate in having the advantage of an excellent exposition of Einstein' s foundational ideas on relativity from a more modern perspective in Robert Geroch' s commentary."--From the Introduction by Roger Penrose, author of The Emperor' s New Mind and The Road To Reality.

"One good way to get a feeling for what relativity theory is all about is to read, in these pages, what the originator of the subject had to say. I have provided comments, attached to various sections of Einstein' s book. The key to understanding relativity is to think about it for yourself."--From the Commentary by Robert Geroch, Professor of Physics, University of Chicago.

"Relativity was a highly technical new theory that gave new meanings to familiar concepts and even to the nature of theory itself. The general public looked upon relativity as indicative of the seemingly incomprehensible modern era, educated non-scientists despaired of ever understanding what Einstein had done, and political ideologues used the new theory to exploit public fears and anxieties--all of which opened a rift between science and the broader culture that continues to expand today."--From the Historical Essay by David C. Cassidy, author of J. Robert Oppenheimer and the American Century, and Einstein and Our World.

"All religions, arts and sciences are branches of the same tree. All these aspirations are directed toward ennobling man' s life, lifting it from the sphere of mere physicalexistence and leading the individual toward freedom."--Albert Einstein

What could be better than an introduction to the theory of relativity by Albert Einstein himself? One that combines Einstein' s original text, written for the layperson nearly a century ago, with insights from today' s leading experts.

Einstein shattered common-sense notions of space and time with the publication of his special theory of relativity in 1905. In the general theory of relativity, published in 1916, he extended the special theory to include gravity, supplanting Newton' s law of universal gravitation, the zenith of the Scientific Revolution. In Relativity: The Special and General Theory, Einstein took his revolutionary theory directly to the people. In simple terms, he carefully laid out the basic concepts of relativity. But almost ninety years have passed since Einstein penned this classic; many advances have been made in our understanding of relativity and space and time.

Robert Geroch, one of the world' s preeminent experts on relativity, builds on Einstein' s work with commentary that addresses the ideas at the heart of the theory, bringing a modern understanding of relativity to the text. He elucidates how special relativity is a reconciliation of the contradictions between the nature of light and the principle of relativity (a long-standing tenet of physics known since Galileo' s time); he expands on Einstein' s treatment of the geometry of space-time and the fundamental notion of an "event"; he explains in detail, but without technical language, the equivalence of inertial and gravitational mass, a cornerstone of general relativity.

Roger Penrose' seloquent introduction frames the creation of both the special and the general theories in the history of science. He argues that even without Einstein, the special theory would have been formulated, as its essential ideas had been put forward before 1905. But the general theory, he shows, is so unique and revolutionary that, without Einstein, we still may not have it today. He also discusses important developments in general relativity since Einstein' s death, and the significance of the theory from the vantage point of contemporary science.

David C. Cassidy explores the impact of relativity outside of physics. In a century of unprecedented scientific advances, yet one of great turmoil, violence, and disillusionment, relativity became a tool of ideologies. Cassidy shows that while the theory reinforced the idea of scientific progress for some, the counterintuitive nature of the theory alienated many nonscientists, opening a rift between science and the public that continues to grow today.

Fully updated 100 years after Einstein published his first papers on relativity, this classic account by the man himself is now ready for twenty-first century readers.

(c) Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

"Synopsis" by ,

Robert Geroch builds on Einstein's work with commentary that addresses the ideas at the heart of the theory, bringing a modern understanding of relativity to the text. He elucidates how special relativity is a reconciliation of the contradictions between the nature of light and the principle of relativity; he expands on Einstein's treatment of the geometry of space-time and the fundamental notion of an "event"; he explains in detail, but without technical language, the equivalence of inertial and gravitational mass, a cornerstone of general relativity.

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